Socrates Architects | Jersey, C.I. | SOCRATES ARCHITECTS ARTS + CULTURE VISION FOR JERSEY’S STEAM CLOCK SITE
Socrates Architects are an award-winning and celebrated creative design-led Jersey architects practice. We operate in Jersey, London, and Nationally.
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SOCRATES ARCHITECTS ARTS + CULTURE VISION FOR JERSEY’S STEAM CLOCK SITE

It is widely regarded as a neglected blot on the landscape, but now Socrates Architects has come up with a scheme he says would revitalise the site of the Steam Clock and transform the surrounding area.

Socrates Architects believes the site has the potential to house an ‘iconic cultural building’ that would act as a landmark for Jersey and be a destination for tourists.

The concept includes the possible relocation of the Jersey Arts Centre to the building, the creation of a Jersey art and architecture gallery and even making it the new site for the Jersey Library. He also says a ‘grand pedestrianised promenade’ could be used to link the site to other under-utilised areas, such as La Folie.

And Mr Socrates says that such a project could act as a ‘catalyst for change’ in the regeneration of a new waterfront development.

Mr Socrates has previously proposed a walkway over the road at the Waterfront and a high-rise tower on the site of Snow Hill toilets to pay for the regeneration of the area and provide access to Fort Regent.

In 2017 he was also shortlisted in a competition to design gates for the new Chelsea Football Club ground.

Visitors to Jersey continue to write reviews about the ageing steam clock on TripAdvisor, ranking it 24 out of 26 things to do in St Helier.

The clock – controversially commissioned by the Waterfront Enterprise Board in 1996 at a cost of £250,000 – has not worked for years and is currently under the care of Ports of Jersey, which says it has no money to refurbish it. Last year, the organisation revealed that it had been approached by a hospitality group wanting to build a hotel on the site.

A total of 23 people have reviewed the steam clock on TripAdvisor since September, most expressing disappointment at its neglected appearance and the fact that it is not working.

The latest, posted just a few days ago from AngieP49 from Poole, says: ‘Sadly this steam clock has been neglected and no longer works. Not only that it is looking worse for wear and really needs some TLC. The clock is in a prominent position and it would be great if it could be repaired and painted to return it to its former glory.’

Mr Socrates, however, believes the site would be better suited to a new cultural quarter – a project he says could be a public and private partnership.

‘We believe that the use of this site should be public,’ he said. ‘There are already museums in the area and by introducing a new, exciting, vibrant arts and entertainment complex Jersey will be creating an exciting and unique cultural waterfront centre, where all forms of art and culture can thrive.

Citing Liverpool’s Albert Dock as an example of how old wharf-side buildings can be put to good use, he added: ‘Any development on this site would need to include the re-routing of the road to the rear of the development allowing for an enhanced public domain parallel to the harbour; a grand pedestrianised promenade featuring al fresco dining etcetera. This new boulevard would enhance the attractiveness and connectivity to sites further afield, such as La Folie.

‘Such a development would also immensely benefit from a lock gate to the town harbour ensuring the sea level remains high at all times.’

https://jerseyeveningpost.com/news/2019/02/06/architect-reveals-visionary-scheme-for-steam-clock-site/

 

 

 

Introduction

The site of the Steam Clock and its surrounding public space presents an opportunity to develop an iconic cultural building which will not only act as a landmark and destination point, but will also serve as a catalyst for change as the first building in the regeneration of a new, regenerated historic waterfront development.

 

 

A New Cultural Quarter

Developing the Steam Clock site into a public cultural building, adjacent to the Maritime Museum and within a short stroll of the Jersey Museum, would create a Cultural Quarter for St Helier. Amongst possible uses, the building could house a relocated Jersey Arts Centre, as the institution is in need of a larger building. This new Arts Centre can double as a Jersey Arts Gallery and Architecture Centre, or it could perhaps be a joint venture with the Tate to create a Tate Jersey.

 

There is also the possibility to house the Jersey Library within the building. Libraries have changed, moving beyond a focus on books alone, to provide communal spaces where people go to work, to study, to hold meetings, and start-up businesses from their laptops. The cultural building will provide inspiring internal spaces where all these endeavours can take place.

 

 

Waterfront

The building is deliberately low-rise in scale to sit in context with the adjacent historic Maritime Museum. It has also been designed to be porous; split into two parts with walkways between the two. This will allow for the building to be inviting whilst maintaining the key views of the harbour from the Weighbridge, Liberation Square and La Route de la Libération.

 

The functions within Commercial Buildings need to be strategically relocated to release this land for prime development. Any development on this site would need to include the re-routing of the road to the rear of the development allowing for an enhanced public domain parallel to the harbour; a grand pedestrianised promenade featuring al fresco dining etc. This new boulevard would enhance the attractiveness and connectivity to sites further afield such as La Folie.

 

Such a development would also immensely benefit from a lock gate to the town harbour ensuring the sea level remains high at all times.

 

Reference

A typical example of a successful regeneration of a disused waterfront would be the Liverpool Docks, where the old wharfside buildings have been not only been transformed into apartments and hotels but also into world-class art galleries and other cultural buildings. This regeneration, in turn, has created a vibrant and lively public part of the city and has contributed to Liverpool’s success in being the most visited city in the UK after of London.

 

 

Conclusion

As this is a visionary proposal, the precise use and end-user is not determined. However, any potential development, rather than being any kind of apartment building, office block, or budget hotel, must be of public and cultural significance, and thereby can contribute to the creation of a new, regenerated historic waterfront development that the public would be proud of.

 

 

JERSEY ARTS CENTRE

Design Brief

1       Jersey Arts Centre

1.1 The Project

1.2 About the Design Brief

1.3 Current Site Situation

2       Vision

2.1 Simply Stated: ‘The Best Art Gallery in the Channel  islands’

2.2 Build the Creative and Cultural Economy

2.3 Invest in Children, Young People and Families

2.4 Promote Community Culture and Heritage

2.5 Learning Centre

2.6 Jersey Arts Centre’s Brand and Jersey Arts Centre’s Niche

2.7 Vision

2.8 Objectives

3       Urban Environment

3.1 Introduction

3.2 Global  island with a local heart

3.3 Site and surroundings

3.4 A dialogue with the  island

4       Key Technical Issues

4.1 Core Design Principles

4.2 Integration of New and Emerging Technologies

4.3 Collections Handling and Delivery

4.4 Join Together Images and Sound

4.5 Staffing

4.6 Facilities Management

4.7 Utilities

4.9 Access, Circulation, Ergonomics and Visitor Comfort

4.10 Security

4.11 24-hour use of the building

4.12 Health and Safety

4.13 Environmental Conditions

4.14 Regulations and Standards for Sustainability

4.15 Acoustics

4.16 Public Art Program

 

 

 

5       JERSEY ARTS CENTRE (Public Areas)                                                                  

5.1 General Access / Main Areas

5.2 Reception and Customer Services

5.3 Circulation Foyer(s)

5.4 Exhibition Galleries

5.5 Activities and Performance Spaces

5.6 Studio Spaces

5.7 Jersey Arts Centre Bar

5.8 Catering Facilities

5.9 Picnic Area

5.10 Chill Out Zone

5.11 Meeting Point

5.12 Public Toilet Facilities

5.13 Buggy + EMV Parking

5.14 Auditorium

 

6       Functional Specifications (Back of House)

6.1 Staff Toilet Facilities / Cleaner’s Room + Stores

6.2 General Office + Facilities

6.3 Facilities Management

6.4 Commercial Retail

6.5 Studio Spaces

6.6 Exhibition Preparation and Storage Spaces

6.7 Workshops

6.8 Staff Offices

6.9 Loading Bay

6.10 Sorting Space

6.11 Cataloging Area

6.12 Photographic Office and Cataloguing Room

6.13 Interim Storage

6.14 Art Depository

7       Strategies

9.1 Introduction

9.2 Sustainability

9.3 Structural & Civil

9.4 Inclusive Design

9.5 Fire Engineering

9.6 Building Services

1 Jersey Arts Centre

1 Jersey Arts Centre

1.1 The Project

‘Jersey Arts Centre brings the art world together to inspire creativity and discovery’.

Jersey Arts Centre will not only be one of the best art galleries in the United Kingdom, but it will also aspire to be a major catalyst for the regeneration of the island of Jersey.

1.2 About the Design Brief

The most appropriate time for major decisions in building projects is in the pre-design stage, at the very beginning of a project. At this stage the range of options is still extensive and decisions and changes to requirements do not yet have costly consequences. It is recognised that at the early stages of the project a shortfall of information means that it can be difficult to make lasting decisions. It is also important to underline that this can lead to delays well into the design and construction stages. When design and construction begin, decision possibilities and changes become more restrictive, tend to be more costly, also in terms of time, and can lead to unsatisfactory solutions.

Establishing a comprehensive Design Brief in the pre-design stage helps to increase the level of information and knowledge, well before the commencement of the actual design work. The main purpose of this detailed Design Brief, is to map, describe and distil the ambitions and aspirations of the various stakeholders that form the Client body into a foundation for all further decision-making, design work and approvals.

Essential project knowledge consists not merely of information supplied by me (the architect), but also knowledge held by the staff and designated users of the future building. This information includes work styles, processes and the resulting spatial requirements. Staff knowledge of the day-to-day working processes is also an essential contribution to understanding the functional requirements. Through a series of interviews and meetings I have acquired detailed information about the project. At this stage, the Design Brief has identified various competing pressures and aspirations that will require further resolution. Under these conditions this Design Brief of November 2013 it cannot not be viewed as a definitive document, but rather as an on-going part of the design development. It therefore allows for small modifications and some additional elaboration within the stated framework. In order to reach the highest level of aspirations for this project it must be recognised that a level of managed flexibility will be of key importance.

1.2.1 Centre of Diversity

The design of Jersey Arts Centre must grow out of the multi-ethnic and multi-cultural diversity of Jersey, promoting and understanding community confidence. The island will become a part of Jersey Arts Centre, and Jersey Arts Centre a part of the island. The qualities of Jersey Arts Centre should be self-evident for everyone. Jersey Arts Centre must represent the social heart of the Jersey citizens. Jersey Arts Centre should be advanced both technologically and functionally; it will offer maximum diversity. The experience should be surprising and inspiring. This needs to be reflected in bi-monthly programming of Jersey Arts Centre. The building should be easily accessible for adults but especially for young people and children. Jersey Arts Centre will be egalitarian, fostering the inclusion of the widest possible audience.

The site of Jersey Arts Centre on Jersey Quai will create a flow of visitors and provide an open anchor, an interior public space and a meeting place for pedestrians and it will become the island’s new icon, whilst addressing the centre existing deficiencies in accessibility, adaptability and lack of space for creative enterprise. Jersey Arts Centre will become a creative and cultural centre for the island.

2 Vision

2 Vision

2.1 Simply Stated: The Best UK Art Gallery the Channel Islands’

Jersey Arts Centre’s mission is to deliver one of the best art galleries in the UK outside of London and the very best in the Channel Islands. A gallery that will be an asset to the island of Jersey and attract visitors and users both locally and nationwide. Jersey has had many identities in its lifetime and is currently re-charting its path to become a cultural based, creative island: one that brings together people from all over the UK and abroad to change lives by enriching them culturally and creatively. This creative-based economy will be fuelled by its own citizens, and as a result of Jersey’s investment in providing the training and guidance necessary to enter the culture and creative workforce. Jersey Arts Centre will be its catalyst.

Jersey Arts Centre will be the social and creative heart of the island, connecting people of all ages, cultures and backgrounds. As a multifunctional service centre, it will appeal to a broad spectrum of people. The building will function as a core of information, art and culture centred on people and community life. It will be a supermarket of creativity and art. Jersey Arts Centre will be a microcosm of Jersey itself, reflecting its potential economic strength and the multiple cultures of its citizens.

The fundamental objectives of Jersey Arts Centre will be to:

  • Build the creative and cultural economy.
  • Invest in children, young people and families.
  • Promote community, culture and heritage.

2.2 Build the Creative and Cultural Economy

Jersey aspires to become a cultural island by providing extensive and unimpeded provision for creativity and the arts. Jersey Arts Centre will provide that platform. The effects of this will be felt throughout the broader community as personal success translates into a stronger economic success for the island.

2.3 Invest in Children, Young People and Families

A core objective of  the Jersey Arts Centre will be the necessity for the project to appeal to children, young people and families in every sense.

Jersey Arts Centre will be designed to offer an adaptable service where children and young people can access resources as they make the transition to adulthood. The spaces must be designed to offer a flexible and diverse choice of learning settings and styles that are safe, welcoming and stimulating. Interactive technology will be pervasive throughout, encouraging the opportunity to explore and learn by discovery and in different ways.

The provision of informal learning environments will support parents and carers in helping their children to learn. The Children’s Area will cater to the specific needs of children and young people.

Ultimately, Jersey Arts Centre will play a unique role in enabling children and young people to realise their full potential.

2.4 Promote Community Culture and Heritage

Jersey Arts Centre will be a major new meeting place, a focal point for citizen and community activity. The design of Jersey Arts Centre will be welcoming and inviting to all, where no barriers (attitudinal, cultural, emotional, institutional, economical, intellectual, physical or sensory) to participation can exist. It will be fully accessible to people with mobility difficulties and to people with all forms of disability.

Jersey Arts Centre must appeal to the citizens of Jersey by instilling a sense of pride and ownership. As a significant and meaningful community space it should become a landmark that comes to define Jersey as an island. Jersey Arts Centre must genuinely meet the needs of the island, and its many diverse communities. The key to the future success lies in being inclusive, open and accessible. This must be a place where everyone feels they belong.

Exhibitions taking place in Jersey Arts Centre will include the island’s interest to promote emerging artists. Many of these emerging artists will be invited to take residence in the Jersey Arts Centre’s studios. Their work will be exhibited and they will continue to work on new pieces during their stay, which in turn will be exhibited again. The studio’s will be accessible to the public on specific days and will act as greater publicity for each artist.

Also exhibitions will be curated to connect with national, regional and local cultural events.

Island events such as major festivals will be supplemented by this venue. Jersey Arts Centre will have spaces that will be programmed distributing activity over the entire day – from morning to evening. The diversity of facilities, spaces and activities will draw a diverse audience, reflecting the diversity of Jersey itself.

 

2.5.1 Community Resource

Jersey Arts Centre will be the central point for citizen access and community participation, with the specialised support necessary to help people to realise their personal and democratic rights and aspirations. The nature of a community space should be communicated where the people of Jersey can feel ownership and pride. For all to feel welcome in the Jersey Arts Centre, unambiguous accessibility is important. The building will be family and children friendly throughout and it will welcome young people. There can be no barriers, physical or otherwise when entering the building. The removal of all barriers to access including attitudinal, economical, cultural, emotional, institutional, intellectual and physical should be of the highest priority in order to foster and ensure the widest possible audience.

Once inside, there will be clear and immediate different functions and places where one can sit, drink a cup of coffee, view the exhibitions, hang out with friends from school.

2.5.2 Memory Bank

‘Without art galleries what have we? We have no past and no future.’

Jersey Arts Centre will gather, preserve, present, exhibit and help to interpret the collective memory and identity of the island and its communities and surroundings. The rich multi-media archive and heritage resources will be accentuated through the provision of the highest quality gallery and exhibition space.

As well as exposing people to new ideas and opportunities, Jersey Arts Centre will create memorable experiences. Through spaces that appeal to the senses, the facilities and services that Jersey Arts Centre offer, memories will be created for generations of local people and visitors.

2.5.3 Cyber-entry Point

Jersey Arts Centre will be the entry point to an array of technologies in new media and communications, disseminating knowledge and ideas that will further fuel the education of the young and the entire community at large. This will also prove that Jersey is an island on the cutting edge of technology. Technology has the potential to aid participation learning, which enhances the experience of individuals, encouraging greater self-knowledge and awareness. Touch-ability, interaction and inviting places to explore these technologies will integrate technology and human experience.

2.5.4 Destination for Creativity and Culture

The diversity of resources and services presented in the Jersey Arts Centre cannot be completely understood by the term ‘gallery’. Jersey Arts Centre is more than an art gallery alone. It will offer visitors a place for recreation and cultural expression. The diversity of services on offer means that everyone will be catered for. Jersey Arts Centre events will take place in a multitude of spaces both inside and outside the building. The building will seamlessly merge with the urban fabric of the island. One should experience the Jersey Arts Centre as a part of the urban promenade, a sequential walk, eventful and lengthy, but also with cross connections for easy and direct use.

2.5.5 Creator of Knowledge Resources

Jersey Arts Centre will generate new forms of information in digital formats, sharing its unique collections for learning, creativity and cultural expression in innovative and imaginative ways. Jersey Arts Centre, with its rich diversity of spaces, will foster further engagement with the available resources. The diversity of stimuli, venues and avenues for expression will mean less distinction between the consumer and producer of culture and creativity. Jersey Arts Centre together will provide an unobstructed platform to facilitate this process.

2.5.6 A Promoter of Sustainability

As an island, Jersey is in an important position to demonstrate through Jersey Arts Centre the most technologically advanced building systems and integrated sustainable principles available. Through the Jersey Arts Centre’s own design, management and operations and through highlighting relevant global developments in its information and services, the building will exhibit the latest in sustainable technologies. Natural lighting would be provided for in both the main body of the Jersey Arts Centre for any spaces that line the building’s perimeter. Each studio and (potential live-in studio) will employ natural day lighting. Operable windows at the exterior would benefit individual interior comfort by enabling natural ventilation.

Eco-technological strategies work well with more passive measures to create a dramatic structure that is both a social activator and successful precedent of sustainable practice that can allow the form of the building to remain true to the drama of its concept. The best sustainable solutions should enhance aesthetic goals, limit resource consumption, improve building performance, and promote health and productivity.

2.5.7 Promoter of Jersey and the Region

The building will be distinctively Jersey, a statement of Jersey’s global position and importance as the Channel Islands’ capital. Jersey Arts Centre will be a people’s palace: warm and welcoming yet with a strong image and equally strong in functionality.

Jersey Arts Centre will express the identity of Jersey through changing exhibitions as well as multimedia displays of events in and around the island. It should be an interactive media experience, enlightening, educating, entertaining and uniquely Jersey.

2.5.8 The Interior Presented on the Exterior

Jersey Arts Centre should become more of an environment than a building. The exterior should read the interior. There should be clear sightlines from anywhere within the building.

The entrance hall will offer a clear overview and functions as the information desk, with public functions, staircases and elevators, shop, café and toilets. From the entrance hall one is offered a view onto some of the functions located on upper and lower floors.

Jersey Arts Centre’s location on Jersey Quai presents an opportunity for the engagement with the public domain.

2.6 The Jersey Arts Centre’s Brand and Jersey Arts Centre’s Niche

Jersey Arts Centre, after over thirty years, has developed a strong brand with a sense of place and purpose. In this case Jersey Arts Centre will specifically place its focus on promoting Jersey artists including emerging artists and video and digital art.

2.7 Vision – Summary

  • Reflects the aspirations of Jersey in relation to a creative and cultural economy.
  • Reflects the aspirations of the island to develop its cultural assets.
  • Retains a clear focus on people: Jersey Arts Centre will achieve inspiration for people, and will offer something for everyone, a truly universal service,
  • Creates a centre for learning, information arts and culture.
  • Becomes an enduring beacon for Jersey, raising the island’s international profile and achieving excellence with local communities.
  • Will be accessible and welcoming to all, reaching out to some of the island’s most disadvantaged citizens.
  • Will be a universal meeting place, a hub for the region, an engine for the cultural and creative economies.
  • Jersey Arts Centre will link the people of Jersey to the world. It will bring the world to Jersey through audio, visual and interactive art, resources and technologies.

2.8 Objectives – Summary

Jersey Arts Centre will:

  • Build the Creative and Cultural economy.
  • Drive economic and social regeneration, enabling citizens to realise their full potential.
  • Promote networking and knowledge exchange, enabling people to come together and learn from one another, in a community space that is open and inclusive to all.
  • Be a hub for culture, creativity and skills through the exploitation of art and communications technology.
  • Support artistic and design research, scholarship and study.
  • Be a model of sustainable design, responsive to technological, social and behavioural change in the information age.
  • Invest in children, young people and families.
  • Be physically child and family friendly.
  • Inspire children and young people as future participants in the world economy.
  • Promote a love of creativity and a need for the arts.
  • Foster life-long learning.
  • Promote community culture and creativity.
  • Be the heart of a regional, local and community network of creative and cultural places.
  • Provide a focal point for community life, contributing to a high quality of life for local residents.
  • Celebrate culture through the audio, visual, multimedia, performance and other art forms.
  • Exhibit and interpret Jersey’s assets to provide inspiration for a learning culture.
  • Conserve Jersey’s assets and collections for future generations.

3 Urban Environment

3 Urban Environment

3.1 Introduction

In a response to current cultural movements and developments in the island, Jersey Arts Centre represents an opportunity to use these contextual conditions as a fundamental basis for the design process.

Jersey Arts Centre will become a vital organ in the public domain of the island, and will be required to respond to the dynamic and diverse audience that the Jersey inhabitants represent.

A key consideration of the design will be how to translate the island’s context, both physically and socially, into the content and appearance of the Jersey Arts Centre.

3.2 Global island with a local heart

3.2.1 Jersey’s Fabric

The structure of pedestrian, vehicle, boat and bus connections has developed into a rich tapestry of squares, roads, harbours, and tunnels. This urban fabric, clearly representing the island’s history, is one of the significant identities of the island’s centre – St Helier.

Seen as a layered network, the upper most dominant layer of this network is the pedestrian route. Jersey Arts Centre presents an opportunity to reinforce this established network. Jersey Arts Centre, located on Jersey Quai will be a key landmark along this harbour-side pedestrian route – connecting the historic centre of St Helier back to Jersey Quai and the Waterfront by route and by a landmark on the skyline.

3.2.2 Diversity of cultures

The global aspect of the local heart can be best appreciated when looking at the broad variety of cultures currently inhabiting Jersey. For the design of the Jersey Arts Centre, this would mean finding a way to represent all of these people into one single building. The starting point for this would be the understanding these cultures and their specific values.

3.2.3 Historic development

The industrial revolution has been a major catalyst of physical and social development of the island. It has given an enormous boost in the explosive way the island has grown and is still an image with which the island is being identified.

For the island of Jersey, the role of water has been a key factor; particularly in the way the island has improved its economic development. The expansion of the harbour structure around the industrial era provided the artery for the transportation of goods and people related to the island’s industries. Jersey Quai now offers the opportunity to regenerate and enhance the leisure and cultural experiences of the island.

3.3 Site and surroundings

The site for the Jersey Arts Centre will replace Offshore Nautical Group, Kufra’s, and the Marina shop the existing surface car. This will be to accommodate for Jersey Arts Centre and allow it to have a harbour-side frontage.

3.3.2 Jersey Arts Centre’s Plaza and Park.

The location and function of the building provides an ideal opportunity to merge an outdoor public space (presently a surface car park and the square where the steam clock is currently located) with the building, creating a fundamental dialogue and connection between island and the building both in the physical and metaphorical sense. Potentially being one of Jersey’s most important public spaces, “Jersey Arts Square” and/or the “Jersey Arts Park” are vital parts of the pedestrian route between Jersey Quai, the Waterfront Developments and the historic centre of St Helier. It will become an important arena for a variety of leisure purposes and events throughout the year.

3.4 A dialogue with the island

‘We define ‘Public Space’ as those places where an exchange between different social groups is possible and also occurs. It is in essence a space that is freely accessible for everyone: public is the opposite of private. In philosophical discussions the public sphere is the place where society is formed, or at least the arena where the collective will is formed with regards to the future of society. But the public realm, as it is also called, also occupies a unique place in society: it is the sphere where we encounter the proverbial ‘other’ and where we must relate to other behaviour, other ideas and other preferences. This means it is also a domain of surprise and reflection. The public realm is ‘the sphere of social relations’ going beyond our own circle of friendships, family and professional relations. The idea of the public realm is bound up with the ideas of expanding one’s mental horizons of experiment, adventure, discovery and surprise.’

‘In search of new public domain’ by Maarten Hajer & Arnold Reijndorp’.

3.4.2 Jersey Arts Centre: the potentials

Jersey Arts Centre is destined to be the impulse to future development on Jersey Quai. It has the potential to reconnect this area to the core of St Helier in a meaningful way, establishing important routes and sightlines between Jersey Quai and the other side of the harbour.

The building has the potential to make Jersey Quai as an island destination. It will become an important node as a place to dwell rather than a transition space as experienced today. Jersey Arts Centre together with the other buildings in the proposed masterplan will form an ensemble of buildings that will convey cohesion of the existing urban fabric by reinforcing established edges of the Jersey Quai development. The ground plane will become a lively activated zone to the benefit of the urban realm. The use of good architecture and improvements to public space will give Jersey Quai and by expansion the Waterfront and historic St Helier renewed importance, reigniting civic pride in its citizens.

Given the current area requirements, the building’s volume offers the potential for extending the public domain to an elevated location affording expansive views across the island. As a landmark, the building will attract a new local, regional and international audience. Raising the island’s profile but also having a significant impact on the local visitor economy.


4 Key Technical Issues

4. Key Technical Issues

4.1 Core Design Principles

There are six core principles that underpin the Design Brief:

1. Flexibility

2. Adaptability

3. Sustainability

4. Accessibility

5. Physically connected and visible to the island

6. Functionality

These principles are of equal importance and will be applied to the building as a whole. In the following paragraphs, the key technical issues related to these principles are reviewed.

4.2 Integration of New and Emerging Technologies

The integration of new technologies is a fundamental part of Jersey Arts Centre. Jersey Arts Centre will be both a physical as well as a virtual place – where citizens will experience new media, expand their knowledge and meet with each other for many decades to come.

4.3 Collections Handling and Delivery

4.3.1 Storage Model

The establishment of the Jersey Arts Centre goes hand in hand with the development of a design model for the storage, care, deployment and access to resources. The major objective is to increase efficiency, to cater for user needs, future-proofing and great presentation and accessibility of resources.

This storage model will result in:

  • An efficient management of the stocks.
  • A good preservation of stocks, allowing staff to fulfil their new role, i.e. providing (active) service to the visitors.
  • Improved physical and virtual accessibility of the stocks.
  • Improved self-learning and guided support by presentation in themes and providing links between resources.

4.3.2 Jersey Arts Centre Storage and Opening Resources

Characteristics:

  • Need for active stock management.
  • Efficient storage which meets the needs of the art whether it is size or sensitivity to light and temperature.

Effective and efficient use of staff resources and speed of delivery of art and/or materials to the exhibitions.

4.4 Joining Together Images and Sound.

Along with the great opportunities for the use of new multi-media technologies, the multilateral character of the Jersey Arts Centre will be enhanced by:

  • Resources will be brought to life by exhibitions, events and activities, enabling users and visitors to experience and learn about culture. Formal and informal performance spaces will be particularly important in achieving this.
  • Promote the various cultural content of the Jersey Arts Centre externally, to the island, to the network of other art galleries and art environments across the island and region.

4.5 Staffing

The main objectives for the new premises of the Jersey Arts Centre with the relation to staffing are:

  • An effective and efficient working environment to achieve excellent customer service with low amount of staff members.
  • An effective and efficient multifunctional foyer joining efficient logistics, providing overview and security, and opportunities for staff to interact with users.

In addition:

  • Exhibitions and display management.
  • Events, activities and other promotions programming.
  • Commercial services.
  • Marketing and communications.
  • ICT and technical support, both organisational and for users.
  • Lifelong learning and support and guidance for learners to enable continued personal and skills development.
  • Access to content and content creation.
  • Building Management Services.

The design will deliver the most efficient operating environment possible for the Jersey Arts Centre.

It will work and share expertise to maximise the use of skills and the efficient deployment of staff. These opportunities are currently being explored and will inform the design.

4.6 Facilities Management

Jersey Arts Centre will be a large and complex building. The design should enable the facility to be occupied and operational 24 hours a day (which may become a reality in the future): it will operate as a single building. High standards of management and maintenance will be essential to the efficient operation and functionality of the building. The building must be designed to be functional, flexible and practical to operate and manage. It must be designed to:

  • Recognise the specific operational needs and requirements of the exhibitions galleries (including studios).
  • Be highly sustainable and cost effective to operate and maintain.
  • Be fully flexible and adaptable in terms of infrastructure, controls, plant and internal fabric to meet future needs.
  • Ensure ease of access to all plant and services for safe service and repair.
  • Enable effective zoning to enable areas of the building to be in operation while others are closed. The specific needs of the galleries (including studios) must be taken into account, including consideration of acoustic separation.
  • Enable easy replacement/maintenance of the fabric of the building to ensure consistently high aesthetic standards are maintained and not compromised.
  • Incorporate intelligent building technologies to enable the integration of management information systems to ensure operational sustainability targets are being met ideally from two central locations via a central Building Energy Management System. This will be required to meet Jersey’ Energy management and Sustainability Section.


4.7 Utilities

4.7.1 New Connections

It is currently unclear as to what the exact nature of the connection of the island energy generation plant will be. The extent of the connection to the island system and the performance of its associated energy generation plant (i.e. efficiency, carbon emissions etc.) will affect the building’s plant space requirements, the sustainability aspirations for the project. It is of fundamental importance that this issue is resolved early in the design process to minimise risk to the program and cost plan for the project.

The current understanding is that hot water and chilled water will be supplied to the building from the island’s system sufficient to cover the base load (circa 75% of the annual demand) but there will be no electrical supply from the island’s energy system. Therefore, secondary heating and cooling systems will need to be located within the building to deal with peak heating and cooling loads and a separate electrical connection to the grid will be required. On this basis the building would not be served by CHP plant, rather a local heating and cooling system. Further detailed evaluations of the various options available will be carried out during the next design stage.

Electrical supplies for certain Life Safety systems and potentially back up systems for the Art depository, galleries and ICT facilities may be sourced from another grid connection if possible or potentially from on site generation. Gas services will be provided by the local gas network infrastructure to suit the building needs, such as kitchens within the catering facilities and a back up plant for critical services if required, Water and drainage connections will be served from local infrastructure. Further analysis of the utilities infrastructure local to the building and the building’s likely energy demands will be carried out at the next design stage.

4.8 Access, Circulation, Ergonomics and Visitor Comfort

4.8.1. General

The new premises of the Jersey Arts Centre are to be appealing, open, and aims to attract and serve visitors, from a broad spectrum of society including children, elderly, tourists, etc. It will set new standards of access for people with disabilities enabling ease of access to all areas of the building.

The Jersey Arts Centre’s visitor footfall is predicted to be in the region of 500 per day.

The building must be designed to be highly legible and have simple, effective signage and guiding for intuitive way finding. Ease of circulation around the building is paramount, offering a variety of means of getting around the building to suit different user needs.

The foyers and entrances will be vital elements of the building. They must be designed to fulfil a number of functions for a range of different audiences throughout the day and evening and able to accommodate the peaks and troughs of people-flow throughout. The challenge will be to design foyers, which attract new visitors, works equally well for all visitors to pass by or to stay.

4.8.2 Visitors & Staff

For staff an efficient access to the building is needed. Besides the main entrance there will be a second entrance with security 24/7. This entrance will be accessible beyond the Jersey Arts Centre’s opening hours. From this entrance, an efficient route to the various departments in the building without crossing the general areas will be required. (This entrance may also apply for the studios for the artists in residence.)

4.8.3 Goods

Vertical access is to be provided via a decentralised core (staircase, elevator). This core will be used for transportation of goods. This elevator and connected spaces (corridors / rooms / doors) should be wide enough for the transportation of big items, for example: furniture or large art works. This elevator is connected to the loading bay area and is not accessible by visitors.

4.8.4 Accessibility

It is very important that the new building provides an inclusive facility that is accessible for all users. Incorporating the principles of inclusive design will benefit the population at large particularly disabled people, older people and parents with children. Understanding and considering the access requirements of disabled people is imperative. In doing so, it is possible to design an inclusive environment that reflects the diversity of people within society and breaks down unnecessary barriers.

Key access issues to address in the design of the building include:

  • Approach routes and arrival at the building.
  • Way finding around the site.
  • Main entrances.
  • Reception areas.
  • Vertical and horizontal circulation around the building.
  • High quality places of communication including access to resources.
  • Sanitary accommodation.
  • Lighting.
  • Acoustics.
  • Signage.
  • Emergency egress for disabled people.

4.9 Security

One of the main conditions for the successful functioning of the Jersey Arts Centre is an appropriate security system, offering excellent security for everyone, without being too perceptible or influencing the building’s attractiveness to visitors.

Besides the specific security needs for the various functions in the building the security systems should follow these principles:

  • Security has to be unobtrusive but effective.
  • ‘Natural ways’ of security: social control by staff as well by visitors, enabled by creating overview and sightlines Demarcation of areas by layout of areas or furnishing, rather then creating barriers
  • The security must meet the highest industry standards where needed.
  • The security system should be very flexible and adaptable.


4.10 24-hour use of the building

The zoning of Jersey Arts Centre should result in a safe and efficient building, with a minimum of safety regulations, security and physical safety systems. Zoning must be an integral feature of the design, enabling different parts of the building to open at different times of the day, whilst maintaining security in other areas that may be closed. It must be possible to shut down individual areas both from an operational and a servicing point of view. Key spaces including the foyer, entrance hall, meeting place, chill-out zone, café and catering facilities will operate outside the normal opening hours of the main exhibition areas. Of course 24-hour access to the potentially ‘live-in’ studios, for the artists in residence is necessary and this access must be separated from any routes connecting the public galleries for out-of-hours access.

4.11 Health and Safety

There is a stated intent of making health and safety an integral part of the building and working ethos of Jersey. The strategy of Health and Safety is of major importance due to the mixture of uses in one building complex and the various types of users daily and occasional visitors.

The building should provide a healthy environment for staff so accidents and ill-health are eliminated and work forms part of a satisfying life for the benefit of both the individual and the organisation. Staff members need to be aware of the responsibility that the conduct of work does not endanger anyone including members of the public.

The building should be healthy and safe for visitors too. Safe access to the building and clear routing are the main points of attention. In addition, information is to be clearly presented in case of emergency. Staff members should have a role in creating a safe environment for visitors.

As in any public building, there are a number of specific threats identified. Wherever possible the opportunity to reduce these threats and they must be taken into account and designed out of the environment so risks can be minimized. Identification of hazards, risk assessments, implementation of procedures, and provision of adequate resources is to be a part of the design. In cooperation with the Jersey Arts Centre, a Health and Safety program is to be developed simultaneously with design development.

4.12 Environmental Conditions

The design of the Jersey Arts Centre building and its installations should ensure that the indoor climate will be comfortable and healthy for all users of the building, for example in terms of temperature, air quality and daylight. The indoor climate should feel natural in relation to the activities that take place within individual rooms.

To achieve the desired internal environments within the various parts of the building, suitable strategies will be developed with consideration of issues such as air quality, thermal comfort, acoustics, security and level of control and flexibility required.

The selection of external environmental design criteria has a significant effect on both the capital cost and operation of certain building services. The frequency of abnormal environmental conditions and the risk if internal conditions deviate from the desired set points must be reviewed to determine appropriate criteria. Where spaces are being conditioned to strict criteria, i.e. to preserve the collection of art and the exhibition spaces, it is likely to be seen as critical that the plant serving these spaces can maintain the desired conditions at all times. However, in other areas it may be acceptable during infrequent abnormal external conditions that the internal conditions deviate slightly. Therefore, as a guide the building services systems serving the storage, depository and exhibition areas could be designed with reference to the following external temperatures.

Extreme seasonal temperature extents are:

  • Summer 32°C. This represents a 0.01 % occurrence over a 24 hour period.
  • Winter -7°C. This represents a 0.01% occurrence over a 24 hour period.

While the building services serving all other areas of the building could be designed with reference to a different set of criteria such as the following, with the likely effect of reduced capital cost and improved efficiency of certain building services.

Acceptable season temperature extents are:

  • Summer 28°C This represents a 0.34% occurrence over a 24 hour period.
  • Winter -5°C This represents a 0.9% occurrence over a 24 hour period.

The design of the building envelope will be critical in maintaining a high quality indoor environment and limiting the building energy consumption, and will be key consideration during the design process. The design of the building envelope will reflect not only aesthetic considerations, but will also be configured for optimum thermal performance i.e. the façade design will aim to maximise daylight penetration, mitigate excessive solar gain and reduce heat loss.

A range of different environmental conditions will be needed to protect the materials and exhibitions whilst allowing public access, however storage areas will not be accessed by the public

The key considerations are:

  • Temperature.
  • Humidity.
  • Light levels/UV control.
  • Air quality and dust/particle filtration.
  • Protection from physical damage.

4.13 Regulations and Standards for Sustainability

4.13.1 Sustainability

Jersey Arts Centre, as a public and educational institution, has a strong obligation to care for the physical and social environment. The construction of the building and the building itself throughout their lifespan should comply with the following:

  • Optimum use of natural resources and reduction in the environmental impact inline with the economical and social requirements.
  • Reduction of energy consumption in the operation of the building.
  • The sustainability approach is incorporated in the physical and technical layout of the building and should go beyond simply meeting standards and regulations where possible.

Main subject of attention:

  • Physical building layout in relation to compactness, flexibility and adaptability during its lifespan.
  • Specific needs of functions.
  • Use of natural resources.
  • Environmental aspects of construction method and materials.
  • Maintenance and lifespan aspects.
  • Minimising the energy demand for heating and cooling.

4.13.2 BREEAM

The Design will aim to obtain a BREEAM rating of Excellent for Jersey Arts Centre and meeting the island’s target for renewable technologies and sustainability without undue increase in the cost of the works. The design must source the best sustainable solutions, using the process of consultation, collaboration and engagement with all the key stakeholders. These should enhance aesthetic goals, limit resource consumption, improve building performance and promote health and productivity. Jersey has a distinguished creative tradition: the Jersey Arts Centre will reinforce this by employing elegant and innovative engineering.

Achieving a BREEAM excellent rating alone will not necessarily achieve the sustainability targets and therefore the Sustainability Strategy identified below will need to encompass a wide range of strategies and include the whole life cycle costing and investment pay back options.

4.13.3 Going for Green

‘Sustainable development is about ensuring a better quality of life for everyone now and for generations to come by bringing together objectives around social, economic and environmental goals’

Jersey is fully committed to the sustainable development of the island and a fundamental objective of this is the protection and enhancement of the environment. Jersey is also committed to procurement decisions that have a direct influence on the Sustainability Strategy.

4.13.4 Jersey Climate Change Strategy

The Jersey Climate Change Strategy aims to reduce Jersey’s carbon emissions by 20% from 1990 levels by 2010, and 60% by 2026. The energy targets aim to “ensure that 15% of energy use in Jersey is from renewable sources and that 30% of it is generated locally by 2020”.

Jersey Arts Centre project will therefore form a key part of this strategy through both the on site application of integrated technologies and also by interfacing with the island’s wider approach to decentralised energy systems.

4.13.5 Energy Performance Building Directive

Jersey Arts Centre will require compliance with the Energy Performance Building Directive. There are many factors associated with energy performance in buildings and in the course of the project: research will be taken to investigate different methods of building design.

On completion of the project an Energy Performance Certificate will need to be produced (based on the theoretical Carbon Dioxide emissions for the building) and displayed to comply with the new EU directive on Energy Performance in Buildings After 12 months a Display Energy Certificate, which determines the actual Carbon Dioxide emissions based on metered energy readings, will need be produced and displayed. During the next design stage preliminary energy performance calculations will be carried out to inform the design development of the energy efficiency of the proposed design.

4.14 Acoustics

As the site is located on the North of Jersey Quai, therefore the Jersey Arts Centre can be exposed to a certain levels of noise. This should be taken into account.

Noise from cars and traffic in general and for example the occasional events taking place on the new “Jersey Arts Plaza” or noise from the foyer can cause inconvenient noise or vibrations in the building. For the main function, the Jersey Arts Centre, noise control is of great importance. To avoid this generally two measurements have to be taken:

  • Zoning of sound-sensitive and sound producing areas.
  • In the layout of the building, especially areas containing various functions, or areas with flexible use close attention to acoustic qualities is crucial. Rooms must be acoustically regulated (and comply to standards) to best suit the function of this rooms and adjacent areas.
  • Floors and slabs between levels must be designed so that impact noise will not spread to adjacent rooms and is not loud in the room itself. Technical installations in the building should emit as little noise as possible so that they do not cause noise pollution inside or outside the building.

4.15 Public Art Program

The future Jersey Arts Centre as an important public place to gather and to educate, also with regard to local and global issues concerning culture and arts. The first task will be to make a clear inventory of the rooms, spaces, areas and zones needed for the proposed Jersey Arts Centre.

Due to the size of the building and the size of the site, various types and sizes of pieces of art are conceivable, ranging from, for example, small objects in internal or external showcases to a collection of pieces that form a storyline through out the site and building.

The planning for exhibiting art should be in accordance with Jersey Arts Centre’s specific guidance.


5 JERSEY ARTS CENTRE: Areas specific to Jersey Arts Centre

5. JERSEY ARTS CENTRE (Public Areas)

5.1.0 General Areas

‘General areas’ refers specifically to those spaces that appear throughout the building serving primarily as necessary supportive function. These areas occur throughout the building.

5.1.1 Main Entrance and Foyer – Introduction

The arrival area(s) of the Jersey Arts Centre are to function as an extended public space. The location and function of the building provide an ideal opportunity to merge an outdoor public space with the building creating a fundamental dialogue and connection between island and the building, both in the physical and metaphorical sense.

The arrival space will be the ‘first impression’ of Jersey Arts Centre and will therefore be key in ensuring an unforgettable experience that will live long in local, regional and international collective memory.

The nature of a community space should be communicated where the people of Jersey can feel ownership and pride. The removal of all barriers to access including attitudinal, economical, cultural, emotional, institutional, intellectual and physical should be of the highest priority in order to foster and ensure the widest possible audience.

5.1.2 Main Foyer

Core Function:

The foyer should be the place from which the flow of arriving people is spread out into the rest of the building. It should offer a number of experiences catering to the diversity of visitor requirements.

The foyer space plays a key role in representing the main values and mission of Jersey Arts Centre supporting its distinct branding requirements.

The foyer will become the space where visitors will receive the first information about the activities in the building and the options available to them. This space should provide and communicate to visitors their customer access choices, service and information as well as circulation and navigation information of Jersey Arts Centre.

Generally, the requirement is to provide a highly accessible environment for both specific and diverse target groups. Some users attend individually, some in small groups and some, in particular school student groups, attend in large numbers. All should feel equally at home in this space.

Accessibility in every sense of the word is a key consideration.

Relationship + Connections:

Adjacent to main entrances.

Space Requirements:

Design Capacity requirements: The foyer should be able to accommodate an agreed peak or range of visitor capacity based on 24/7/365 facilities access and a predicted daily peak capacity (during Christmas and Summer) of 1000 people per day.

Remarks (Specific Requirements):

Accessibility is a core requirement in the design of this space.

5.1.3 Main Entrance

Core Function:

Of key consideration is the legibility and accessibility of the main entrance whilst providing an immediate sense of arrival. Although there may be multiple entrances to the building there should be a main entrance providing access to the shared foyer areas. The values of the Jersey Arts Centre must be communicated and the status of the ‘whole’ should be integral to and lead naturally into the main foyer.

Relationship + Connections:

It should directly access the central foyer space housing their central reception facility. Other entrances (required for maximum occupancy and/or fire safety) should be sited in discreet appropriate areas.

Close proximity to blue-badge parking facilities, coach and car drop-off points, public parking, taxi bays, bicycle racks and the closest public transport will be vital. The island’s transport plan must be considered in this context to ensure that access, business and navigation needs are satisfied in the location and design of the entrances.

The entrance should also be a close to ATM, toilets, service lifts and stairs/lifts/escalators.

Space Requirements:

Occupancy capacity requirements: The foyer should be able to accommodate an agreed peak or range of visitor capacity based on 24/7/365 facilities access and a predicted daily peak capacity (during Christmas and Summer) of 1000 people per day.

Remarks (Specific Requirements):

The entrance doors should be intelligent and part of the security system and capable of resisting significant attempts at intrusion. Highly robust finishes to be applied to these spaces.

5.2 Reception and Customer Services

Core Function:

This is where people should have fast and easily accessible information about the Jersey Arts Centre. The reception area should clearly show that this is the interface between visitors and its respective building. It must be highly visible and capture the attention of people entering the building. It must be absolutely clear that this is a place where visitors can get help.

This area will link the visitor to the purpose, functions, services, events and facilities of the entire building. As such the area must communicate openness and accessibility. This area may also provide a tourist information centre and other such facilities and will provide an information outlet for the many community partnerships with which each organisation engages.

The area will be supported by self-service information and navigation of the building therefore allowing staff to focus on individual requirements. Consideration of a modular/ adjustable counter system may facilitate adaptation to various visitor demands.

Relationship + Connections:

This area needs to be central to the main ground foyer. It should be close to public facilities such as toilets, cloakrooms and upper level access – i.e stairs, escalators, lifts to all parts of the building. Adequate and accessible storage will be vital in maintaining a tidy and clean environment. This area must link to a secure office/non-public space where cash collection, counting and balancing can take place securely.

Space Requirements:

Occupancy capacity requirements: The foyer should be able to accommodate an agreed peak or range of visitor capacity based on 24/7/365 facilities access and a predicted daily peak capacity (during Christmas and Summer) of 1000 people per day.

Remarks (Specific Requirements):

A queue management system is to be provided. It should be clear that this area is ‘neutral territory’.

5.3 Circulation Foyer(s)

Core Function:

Flowing from the main foyer, the circulation foyer should direct visitors accessing specific parts of the building. In essence, the circulation foyer acts as a threshold between the main foyer and the specific functions of the Jersey Arts Centre. These areas may need to be zoned off and secured according to operational requirements.

The circulation foyer should reflect the very different and specific individual requirements of Jersey Arts Centre. The foyer needs to consider a generally more constant customer flow with seasonal.

The foyer(s) in the Jersey Arts Centre need to be able to operate independently as customer numbers fluctuate. To maximise use of each area for activities independent of exhibitions, the ability to easily zone areas would be advantageous. Effective lighting and acoustic management of the area is key in this regard.

Relationship + Connections:

The Jersey Arts Centre foyers need to be adjacent to the major exhibition spaces/auditorium via stairs, escalators, lifts. Both foyers should contain toilets and accessible toilets and provide easy security monitoring. The Jersey Arts Centre foyer particularly, must comply with all licensing, health and safety and fire evacuation requirements. They will be close to ATM, toilets and accessible toilets, service lifts and stairs/lifts/escalators.

5.3.1 Cloakroom and Locker Facilities

Core Function:

All visitors to the building should easily access these facilities.

This is an area where personal items such as bags and coats can be left. The area may only be staffed at certain times therefore the space should be designed to retain its function as a self-service cloakroom. These facilities could also be completely self-service.

These could be in a less ‘central location’ but would require an increased security system.

The gallery visitors can demand up to 50 ‘coat spaces’ plus up to 50 bags/suitcases/shopping items, at any one time, during peak periods at Christmas and summer months.

Relationship + Connections:

The area needs to be central to each entrance. It must be close to toilets, reception and under surveillance of the security systems.

Space Requirements:

Amount: 1 area.

Dimensions: to be determined.

Size: approx. 25m2 gross floor area.

Total area: 25m2 gross floor area.

Remarks (Specific Requirements):

Heighten security risk.

5.4 Exhibition Galleries – Introduction

The Exhibition Galleries are key in expanding the audience of the Jersey Arts Centre. The exhibitions will focus on showcasing local art work to visitors. The exhibition space should be stimulating and will incorporate a level of interactively to wholly engage with the viewer both intellectually and spiritually.

Jersey Arts Centre’s focus will be placed on local artists, audio-visual installations and also showcasing the UK contemporary art.

Technical and environmental conditions should be of the highest quality whilst allowing for creative and flexible layout for various exhibitions types.

5.4.2 Main Exhibition Spaces

Core Function:

This space will be considered as a destination space providing a multi-sensory experience and be used for a programme of thematic and format based exhibitions. It should appeal to a broad audience and therefore allow for many types of exhibitions of varying media. The gallery should incorporate a modular approach to spatial configurations – capable of being converted into more than one space or a smaller space(s).

Relationship + Connections:

Most important adjacencies are digital lab, the art depository/ storage, loading bay and main building entrance. The Galleries need not be on the same floor as these areas, although should be on an adjacent floor at least. Service routes should avoid passing through this area.

Space Requirements:

Amount: TBC.

Dimensions: To be determined.

Total size: approx. TBC.

Occupancy capacity requirements: To be determined.

Remarks (Specific Requirements):

The internal environment of the Main Exhibition Space is to be designed to American Standard for Heating Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Class of Control AA. ASHRAE standards have been selected as there is currently no relevant Chartered Institute of Building Services (CIBSE) standard. This should provide a suitable compromise between the internal conditions required for exhibits and visitors to the gallery. It is proposed that exhibits that require different environmental conditions would be stored within conditioned display cases with inbuilt temperature and humidity control as per recommendations in BS5454. To comply with the National Heritage Act 1980 the relative humidity, temperature and light levels will be monitored.

5.4.3 Exhibition Preparation Space

Core Function:

This space will be used for preparing materials for exhibitions and will need to be immediately adjacent and have access to the main exhibition spaces and their associated storage space. The space should be a regular shape and flexible with power availability throughout and with access capable of taking large to extremely large objects.

Relationship + Connections:

(See main exhibition space).

Space Requirements:

Amount: 1.

Dimensions: To be determined.

Total size: approx. TBC.

Remarks (Specific Requirements):

As this space will be used for the preparation of exhibits, which require specific environmental conditions, it is proposed that the temperature and humidity are controlled in a similar manner to the Main Exhibition space. This will reduce the need for acclimatization when materials are moved between the two spaces. However, as certain materials may be without display cases in this area, the temperature band would be reduced to 20degC ±1degC. To comply with the National Heritage Act 1980 the relative humidity, temperature and light levels will be monitored.

5.4.4 Exhibition Storage Space

Core Function:

This space will be used for storing exhibition equipment such as frames, vitrines, lights etc and will need to be immediately adjacent and have access to the Main exhibition space and associated preparation space. The space should be a regular shape and flexible with power availability. The space will need to be able to store moveable display modules, frames and display cases. The frame store will need an efficient racking system.

Relationship + Connections:

Immediately adjacent to main exhibition space and exhibition preparation space.

Space Requirements:

Amount: 1.

Dimensions: To be determined.

Total size: approx. TBC m2 gross floor area.

Remarks (Specific Requirements):

Full climatic control where necessary, adjustable lighting conditions. High level of security required.

5.5 Activity and Performance Spaces

Core Function:

Throughout Jersey Arts Centre a series of informal performance and activity spaces should be made available.

Flexibility and adaptability is of key consideration in order to maximise use. The space needs to be identifiable yet flexible, easily deconstructed or redefined.

A less formal approach to this space is appropriate, as the area should accommodate the possibility for impromptu performances. Performers and performances will be varied and could range from professionals to children and community members.

The space should maintain high visibility to other visitors passing by, rather than enclosed activity: as such the space may incorporate a small demountable stage.

Relationship + Connections:

Not adjacent to quiet areas.

Space Requirements:

Occupancy capacity requirements: To be determined.

Remarks (Specific Requirements):

Provision of adequate supporting infrastructure such as digital media, power, lighting etc

5.6 Studio Spaces

Core Function:

Jersey Arts Centre provisions of new studio spaces where a wide variety of artists, designers and makers can work in residence increasing the potential for greater participation and collaboration and attracting new audiences. The new studio spaces will be designed to ensure maximum flexibility in terms of differing working needs of the artists and designers, whilst also allowing for personal adaptation in every aspect of its operation. Studios will be open to the public on specific days.

Relationship + Connections:

The studios may be located as a separate element to the main Jersey Arts Centre – an auxiliary building which is connected. Or the studio will be encompassed within the Jersey Arts Centre and access is controlled. The studio will need natural day lighting. Ideally North light

Amount: TBC.

Total size: approx. 25-30m2 each.

Remarks (Specific Requirements):

All studios will have access to water, (a sink, and a self-contained bathroom units). All units must be fitted with fire alarms and smoke detectors. Live-in option – (All studios to allow for a bed on maisonette floor, therefore the ceiling height must be at least 4.2 metres.)

5.7 Jersey Arts Centre Bar

Core Function:

The bar forms a key facility for the Jersey Arts Centre. In this area provision should be made for alcohol, beverages, confectionary and snacks to any visitor to the building, but in particular for servicing the gallery visitors. The bar should also provide meeting spaces, hospitality and private party areas with the flexibility to support conference activity during the daytime. The bar must be large and well organised, allowing for optimum service during the peak ‘pinch-points’ for serving up to 200 people.

Users will be a very diverse group. Acoustic management and in particular enhancement systems for deaf or hard of hearing customers will be needed. Layout, sight lines and security systems need to accommodate the need for effective management of anti-social behaviour. Stock and equipment must be easy to lock-down and open, clean and maintain. Given the diversity of the customer base these areas should be egalitarian allowing for a range of styles/lighting/colours/layouts.

There should be provision of an alcohol-free bar area to service children, families and customers whose religion proscribes alcohol.

Relationship + Connections:

The bar needs to be in close proximity to the toilets, service lifts and primary catered facilities/kitchens. They should be connected to the main foyer and/or a part of the circulation foyers for the exhibition spaces. The bar must be an integrated part of a stock control system. There must be adequate provision for the secure handling of floats, till management and cash-ups. Such a secure area with a day safe could be a shared facility with reception and tickets sales to the featured exhibitions. Personal security of staff and customers is important so surveillance and ease of access for security staff is important. The bar must support easy access for daily cleaning and high standard cleaning. Signage to other parts of the building and in particular the exhibitions must be clear and accessible.

Space Requirements:

Amount: 1.

Dimensions: To be determined.

Size: approx. TBC. gross floor area.

Total size: approx. TBC. m2 gross floor area.

Occupancy capacity requirements: The area should accommodate up to 250 people comfortably.

5.8 Catering facilities

The details for this requirement will be informed by the outcome of consultancy studies currently underway. This function requires detailed resolution and forms part of on-going investigation.

Core Function:

This area consists of restaurant facilities, kitchen and its associated storage as well as retail ancillary space. The details for this requirement will be informed by the outcome of consultancy studies currently underway. This function requires detailed resolution and forms part of on-going investigation.

Relationship + Connections:

Catering areas will need to be adjacent and accessible to the Picnic Area, bar and exhibition gallery’s circulation area.

Space Requirements:

Amount: 1.

5.9 Picnic Space

Core Function:

The picnic space should be a spacious area allowing for multi-functional use. It should invite and provide visitors with an opportunity to bring and consume their own food and beverages. It should be large enough to accommodate groups and individuals with varied types of furniture and furniture arrangements. The space should have the possibility of offering a space reservation basis only for groups, and some on an ad hoc drop in basis. The former could therefore be used for other activities when available.

Particular attention must be paid to the ease of cleaning and also provision for adequate food and rubbish disposal. The space should have vending and water facilities, sinks and hand dryers. They should be fully accessible, but with secure exits for safely accommodating groups of young children. The space should not be specifically designed for children, however anticipation of high child use means that it should accommodate their behaviour and needs.

Relationship + Connections:

It should be located within easy access of the Jersey Arts Centre services. The space should also be as close as possible to the entrances for ease of access to coaches and other transport. Accessible toilets should be within easy reach and should be close to ATM, exhibition galleries, service lifts and stairs/lifts/escalators.

Space Requirements:

Occupancy capacity requirements: To be determined.

Remarks (Specific Requirements):

The space and its layout should be able to handle noisy groups, as such special consideration should be given to acoustic control. It is essential that the space has access to a music installation system. Furniture must be easy to move.

5.10 Chill Out Zones

Core Function:

This space should be a designated and identifiable area within Jersey Arts Centre with no specifically programmed use. It should allow for occupation by any number of users from individuals to groups. Given the flexibility of use of this space, consideration should be given as to how to navigate conflicting requirements of accommodating all whilst making an allowance for the needs of specific users.

Provision should be made for both low and high technology areas, accommodating both lively and quiet users. The areas should include some food and beverage vending machines.

The areas should have comfortable soft furnishings that are easy to clean, maintain and move for maximum flexibility.

Relationship + Connections:

These areas should be available on each floor, close to catering facilities as well as toilet facilities.

Space Requirements:

Amount: Space allocation will be required per floor.

Occupancy capacity requirements: To be determined.

Remarks (Specific Requirements):

The space should respond to preferred customer usage as they emerge. An emphasis on varied types of furnishings for highest flexibility is essential.

5.11 Meeting Point

Core Function:

The meeting point is a designated area where people can meet each other. It should be clearly defined, legible and visible. This area should not be considered a room but rather a zone with a distinctive space and character. The area should be able to accommodate large groups of people with comfortable seating, internet accessible computers and reading materials. It should be designed to deter anti-social ‘grouping’ and be close to the reception support with low-key supervision.

Relationship + Connections:

This area should be central to the main entrances and reception areas, toilets and public services. Close to ATM, toilets and accessible toilets, service lifts and stairs/lifts/escalators.

Remarks (Specific Requirements):

Seating should be fixed yet demountable to allow the space to be used for other purposes if required. Fixtures and furnishings must be easy to clean and robust.

5.11.1 Group Visit Areas

Core Function:

Groups should be adequately accommodated throughout Jersey Arts Centre. Spaces for these groups should incorporate comfortable furniture that supports initial briefings and short presentations. Capacity for small refreshments and technology is also preferred.

Space Requirements:

Occupancy capacity requirements: Groups of up to 25 people.

Remarks (Specific Requirements):

Access to technology and presentation facilities should be provided.

5.11.2 Help Point

Core Function:

Areas away from the interactive zones will require help points for staff to support customers with quick enquiries/issues. Issues of adaptability should be considered in order to respond to customer demand and organisational needs. These could be unobtrusive facilities available for brief enquiries.

Help points should be child friendly and of a suitable scale.

5.12 Public Toilet Facilities

Core Function:

These facilities will service customers and visitors to the foyer areas. This means that potentially a broad public will use these facilities. Given the diverse groups of people visiting the building, the facilities should therefore reflect this diversity of requirements and include adequate provision for children and parents as well as disabled visitors. Facilities may vary in dimension in order to address these needs specifically.

Consideration should also be given to the way in which facilities will be used throughout the day. Moments of intense use occur during lunchtimes and also coincide with both Jersey Arts Centre events. Events taking place in the new “Jersey Arts Plaza” will also place high demands on these facilities.

Further, sustainable use of water and cleaning products should be prioritised. This subject is detailed as part of the sustainability strategy.

Focus should be placed on the ease of use and robustness. In addition, given the high public usage envisaged for the building, all fixtures, fittings and surfaces selected should be of adequate and appropriate quality to reflect this imperative. Naturally, provision of good light and ventilation are essential.

Relationship + Connections:

Public toilet facilities should be in close proximity to exhibiting gallery’s entrances and general reception areas, proximity to cleaning services and general maintenance access is also a priority. Catering and bar facilities will also require specific toilet provision.

Space Requirements:

Dimensions: 0.90 x 1.50 m per toilet cubicle minimum.

Size: 4m2 gross area per toilet cubicle minimum (includes entrance area).

Remarks (Specific Requirements):

Allow for effective, deep and high standard cleaning. Allow for self-cleaning functions where possible.

Attention to the prevention of misuse and vandalism including the use of anti-graffiti surfaces. Incorporate environmentally efficient disposal of sanitary waste.

Fittings and fixtures to possibly provide for particular cultural needs of users.

5.12.1 Toilets, Unisex Toilets

Core Function:

The facilities should be designed for both adults and children. Facilities should include fixtures for when children are training. Consideration must be given to the high demand on these services at peak periods.

Relationship + Connections:

Proximity to baby change / feeding facilities.

Space Requirements:

Amount: 2 minimum – more preferred.

Dimensions: 0.90 x 1.50 m.

Size: approx. 6m2 gross floor area.

Total area: 12m2 gross floor area.

5.12.2 Baby Changing / Feeding Facilities

Core Function:

This area should be suitable for parents and carers visiting the Jersey Arts Centre to comfortably feed and change babies, toddlers and younger children. This needs to be a unisex environment.

For reasons of discretion, private lockable cubicles for breastfeeding mothers should be provided.

Facilities in these areas should include bottle heating facilities, hand wash basins, changing tables, individual toilets with changing facilities and washbasins, adequate and environmentally efficient food and sanitary waste system: potable water supply, fixed microwaves, and highchairs.

Relationship + Connections:

It needs to be accessible for cleaning and close to security surveillance. The buggy park should be as close as possible.

Space Requirements:

Amount: 1.

Total size: approx. 8m2 gross floor area.

Occupancy capacity requirements: To be determined.

Remarks (Specific Requirements):

The safety and security of children is to be of paramount importance.

Allow for clear and multi-lingual facility information.

5.13 Buggy + EMV Park

Core Function:

The users of Jersey Arts Centre should be provided with adequate space to safely park buggies and EMVs.

These areas could be accommodated close to the outside of the entrances rather than inside the foyer as self-service lock-ups, assuming secure and appropriate locations and ease of access to foyer.

This space needs to be very accessible, user-friendly and adaptable to accommodate demand.

Consideration of door openings and corridors leading to this area should be sufficiently wide for ease of access and movement.

Relationship + Connections:

These areas should also be close to entrance and toilets.

Space Requirements:

Amount: 1.

Dimensions: To be determined.

Total size: approx. 10m2 gross floor area.

Occupancy capacity requirements: The area should accommodate up to 5 buggies and 2 EMVs.

Remarks (Specific Requirements):

It should be under the surveillance of security systems.

Remarks (Specific Requirements):

The safety and security of children is to be of paramount importance.

The allowance for clear and multi-lingual facility information is also necessary.

5.14 Auditorium

Core Function:

The functional design brief sets out all the activities that will take place in the building and thereby acts as a foundation for the spatial and technical design brief. Once the programming plans are clear, we can determine the required spaces and their technical fittings.

Spatial design:

A theatre is always a logistical hub, and the proper functioning of the building depends on how well audiences, technology, staff and catering are organised. A logistical plan indicates the anticipated flow of traffic and how bottlenecks can be avoided.

Technical design:

Once the spaces are defined and it is clear what their purposes or dual purposes are, technical requirements can be set out. The technical design brief details the architectural and technical/installation requirements for the theatre.

Relationship + Connections:

Not adjacent to quiet areas. Foyer as buffer.

Space Requirements:

800 seats / To be determined.

Remarks (Specific Requirements):

Provision of adequate supporting infrastructure such as digital media, power, lighting etc.


6 Functional Specifications  (Back of House)

6.0 Functional Specifications

The functional specification states both the operational and aspirational requirements that will form the basis of the design phase tasks. Some of these items have conflicting requirements that must be reconciled and resolved during the next phases in the design process. It contains detailed information concerning the amount, size and quality of spaces as well as the required proximity of functions and spaces, requirements concerning the functional and essential technical requirements, image and appearance as well as other requirements specific to the project as known to date. The functional specification describes the functional requirements all areas of the project, encompassing also general service areas and ‘back of house’ zones.

6.1.1 Staff Toilet Facilities

Core Function:

These facilities will service staff of the Jersey Arts Centre.

Similar to the public toilets functional requirements, staff toilets should reflect the diversity of staff requirements including provision for disabled staff.

For operational purposes these facilities may be located in close proximity to staff areas. Further, sustainable use of water and cleaning products should be prioritised. This subject is detailed as part of the Sustainability strategy.

Focus should be placed on the ease of use and robustness. In addition, all fixtures, fittings and surfaces selected should be of adequate and appropriate quality. Naturally, provision of good light and ventilation are essential.

Relationship + Connections:

Catering and bar facilities will also require specific toilet provision.

Staff toilet facilities will need to be located close to other staff areas such as staff offices and facilities.

Space Requirements:

Dimensions: 0.90 x 1.50 m per toilet cubicle minimum.

Size: 4m2 gross area per toilet cubicle minimum (includes entrance area).

Remarks (Specific Requirements):

Allow for effective, deep and high standard cleaning. Allow for self-cleaning functions where possible.

Attention to the prevention of misuse and vandalism including the use of anti-graffiti surfaces. Incorporate environmentally efficient disposal of sanitary waste.

Fittings and fixtures to possibly provide for particular cultural needs of users.

6.1.2 Accessible Toilets

Core Function:

Provision must be made to serve wheelchair, EMV and other mobility impaired users and their caregivers with facilities. Accessible toilets must be of equal standard to other toilets.

Thought must be given to robustness, as well as the ease and modesty of ingress and egress. These facilities must be accessibility compliant and exceed DDA requirements. One accessible toilet should be a full personal care suite and be able to accommodate a mobile bed and/or allow an EMV, large wheelchair, a hoist, its user and caregivers with comfortable access and space to use the facilities with ease. Furthermore, these facilities shall be linked to the emergency response system with easy access for staff to respond.

Naturally, provision of good light and ventilation are essential. In addition, given the high public usage envisaged for the building, all fixtures, fittings and surfaces selected should be of adequate and appropriate quality to reflect this imperative. Further, sustainable use of water and cleaning products should be prioritised. This subject is detailed as part of the Sustainability strategy. The provision of at least one facility on every floor is also required.

Relationship + Connections:

All facilities should be directly accessible from the exhibition galleries, bar, catered areas and general reception area. Where a priority is needed, these toilets should be nearer to the service area in question than those for non-disabled customers. Preference is given to locate these facilities close to cleaning services and general maintenance access. Obvious, direct and easy access to main entrance and exit doors is also required.

Space Requirements:

Dimensions: 1.60 x 2.80 m per toilet cubicle minimum.

Size: 8m2 gross floor area per toilet cubicle minimum (includes entrance area).

Remarks (Specific Requirements):

Allowance must be made for effective, deep and high standard of cleaning. Where possible self-cleaning functions should be included. Attention to the prevention of misuse and vandalism including the use of anti-graffiti surfaces should be incorporated.

6.1.3 Cleaner’s Room + Stores

Core Function:

Cleaner’s rooms and associated store should provide space for all necessary general and specialist equipment and cleaning materials, including all necessary sinks, drainage and waste systems to cope with the range of cleaning needs. The provision of four low level sinks with hoses, a sluice/incinerator or similar waste disposal system for solid matter, two large lockable cupboards for storage of cleaning materials and chemicals, shelves for stocks of sanitary materials, space for spare waste bins, sanitary bins and other equipment, racks for storage of cleaning equipment such as vacuum cleaners and mop buckets, a washing machine and dryer and a domestic sink unit is to be included within this area.

It is essential that the space provide a safe and healthy working environment for all users, with specific consideration for those who will be using chemicals, hot water, steam and other hazardous materials.

Relationship + Connections:

The space should be accessible to all aspects of the customer service functions with particular focus on exhibition areas and bar/cafe areas. It must have good service lift access to support safe and efficient operations and ease of waste disposal. Access for cleaning staff to the staff briefing/rest room will be required to support necessary meetings and break requirements.

Space Requirements:

Amount: TBC.

Dimensions: To be determined.

Size: 4m2 gross floor area minimum.

Remarks (Specific Requirements):

Highly robust finishes to be applied to spaces.


6.2.1 General Staff Offices + Facilities

Core Function:

A particular part of the building should be determined to accommodate staff, relating specifically to the operational management of Jersey Arts Centre related activities. Bearing in mind the need for a durable, adaptable office environment, a maximum amount of flexibility should be integrated within its design. The possibility to create multiple variations of floor layouts with regards to furniture is part of that demand. Necessary spaces to house lockers and kitchen areas are required for these functions.

Relationship + Connections:

As the offices with their necessary functional spaces should be considered a unity, they should be located in close proximity to each other as they provide interdependent services. If adjacent to the cleaner’s room, the staff briefing and rest rooms could accommodate cleaning staff also.

Furthermore, this unit will need to be near to the toilets, service lifts and stair/lifts/escalators.

Space Requirements:

Schedule of accommodation: To be determined.

Design Capacity requirements: To be determined.

500m2 will adequately cover a minimum capacity of 18 workstations.

Remarks (Specific Requirements):

Office spaces need to be flexible and adaptable to changing user requirements. They must be accessible for disabled staff and visitors.

6.2.2 First Aid/Changing Rooms

Core Function:

These spaces are an essential requirement of the building. A comprehensive first aid service must be provided for both staff and visitors. First Aid rooms should house a bed, locked supply cabinet, toilet and washbasin, adequate and appropriate waste disposal system (i.e. bodily fluids) and room for patient, first aider and patient’s attendants.

Changing facilities are required for adults and carers who may require this facility in relation to accessible toilet facilities. Staff changing facilities for motor/cyclists will need to be made available elsewhere as a separate facility with lockable changing rooms including shower facilities to provide adequate space for individuals to change their clothing including space for mirror and chair. Particular attention to the health and safety of users and ease of cleaning (surgical and general) are also important. Pairs of rooms should be able to break down into one larger room.

Relationship + Connections:

Accessible from public foyer area and close to entrance. Accessible by paramedic team/ambulance or other vehicles. Close to security surveillance. Close to ATM, toilets and accessible toilets, exhibition galleries, service lifts and stairs/lifts/escalators.

Space Requirements:

Amount: 1.

Dimensions: To be determined.

Total size: approx. 20m2 gross floor area.


6.2.3 Storage Spaces

Core Function:

This staff-only accessed area will provide a storage facility for programmes and scripts, merchandise and retail items, ticket stock for the Jersey Arts Centre, stationery items, publicity, first aid stock, display boards and third party equipment and stock for both organisations etc. For aesthetic and operational reasons storage stock will be limited in the reception area, therefore a facility that sufficiently caters to this need will be required for both organisations.

This facility should allow for access by couriers and delivery services to either load in directly from the street or from service lift provision from the loading bays. The area must be secure and safe, with appropriate racking, shelving, access and retrieval equipment to minimise any health and safety risks for staff.

This space should be easily and safely accessible for staff and be under security surveillance.

Relationship + Connections:

This area does not need to be central to the foyer, but should be reasonably close to reception, service lift and unloading bays provision for ease of operation.

Space Requirements:

Amount: 1.

Dimensions: To be determined.

Total size: approx. 20m2 gross area.

6.2.4 Staff Briefing / Rest Rooms

Core Function:

The staff briefing/rest room should adequately accommodate up to 12. This area will also serve to accommodate ancillary staff members such as firemen, ushers and catering/bar staff.

This area should also include secure lockers and a kitchen area. The staff rest room could be adjacent to the cleaner’s room to accommodate cleaning staff as well.

Space Requirements:

Amount: 1.

Dimensions: To be determined.

Total size: approx. 20m2 gross floor area.

Occupancy capacity requirements: The area should accommodate up to 12 staff.

Remarks (Specific Requirements):

In accordance with statutory requirements offices need to be accessible for disabled staff and visitors.

6.3 Facilities Management

6.3.0 Security Operations Introduction

The diverse nature of this building will require a clear understanding and management strategy that will deal with the unique operational aspects of the building. Some parts of the building are to be open when others will be closed, in particular, the Conference Rooms, Restaurants and Bar, exhibition areas. Systems should be designed so that areas can operate discreetly: this includes the security of these areas. The security system should emphasise balance through the appropriate use of staff and technology. Security should be unobtrusive yet effective.

Clear site lines, no dead legs both inside and out, and well-defined security lines will facilitate a balanced approach to security. As in any public building, there are a number of threats identified. The theft of stock and equipment, intellectual property theft, opportunistic crime, disruptive behaviour, anti social behaviour, violent visitors, visitors with mental health issues and terrorism.

The foyer will play a key role in establishing the system of security to be implemented. It is envisaged that there will be security presence in the foyer in the form of meet and greet and concierge personnel.

Stock will need to be protected and detection devices incorporated behind the Jersey Arts Centre’s security line discreetly, but with an ability for a member of staff to challenge if the device is activated.

Specific areas such as the Galleries and storage areas for the Jersey Arts Centre will require an individual approach for a high level of specialist security.

The security systems must be capable of being modified and added to satisfy future requirements. The security for the Jersey Arts Centre must meet the highest industry standards.

Core Function:

Fully integrated CCTV office covering monitoring facilities to the complex, Linked back to the BCC and Police Control Office. It will house the BMS/Fire/ Intruder/ Personal Attack/ Flood and Tannoy System.

Relationship + Connections:

This area should be next to the Services reception(s) and foyer(s).

Space Requirements:

Amount: 1.

Total size each: approx. 20m2 gross floor area.

6.3.1 Security Interview Room

Core Function:

This room needs to be front of house, in a discreet area near to the foyer. The use will be for customers who are detained and police interviews.

Relationship + Connections:

This area should be next to the Services reception and foyer.

Space Requirements:

Amount: 1.

Dimensions: To be determined.

Total size each: approx. 20m2 gross floor area.

6.3.2 Secure Storage Area

Core Function:

A secure storage area for small deliveries/packages will be a function of this area. Staff will bank monies: there will be a requirement for a safe so the office area must be secure.

Relationship + Connections:

Adjacent to Security Control room.

Space Requirements:

Amount: 1.

Dimensions: To be determined.

Total size: approx. 10m2 gross floor area.

6.3.3 Building Management Services Office

Core Function:

The space will be used by the Facilities Team. These include spaces for the Finance and Administration and some Management functions for the building. It will include the Facilities Help Desk/Services Reception/Conference Room Booking Team on site base for contractors, including BMS functions and Controls for the building, Van Drivers, Security Manager and Onsite Maintenance.

Relationship + Connections:

Adjacent to: Staff Entrance, Loading Bay, Security Control, Goods lift, ICT workshop and store, bib services. Stores, staff changing rooms, showers for staff, cycle store and Loading Bay Records Management.

Space Requirements:

Amount: 1.

Total size: approx. 20m2 gross floor area.

Occupancy capacity requirements: There would be approx. 4 permanent ‘back of house’ staff/contractors. An office for back of house visitors for approx. 4 people.

6.3.4 Services Reception/Facilities

Core Function:

This is an area for a helpdesk and management office. The area is designed to be multi-functional in order to carry out a number of duties whilst servicing reception.

Waiting area will also need to be incorporated.

Relationship + Connections:

Adjacent to the main back of house entrance area.

Space Requirements:

Amount: 1.

Dimensions: To be determined.

Total size: approx. 30m2 gross floor area.

Occupancy capacity requirements: Should support minimal permanent staff.

6.3.5 Staff Entrance Area and Ancillary Spaces

Core Function:

This area will be the main back of house entrance, it should be able to be standalone so it can be opened when the Jersey Arts Centre is closed. This area will service the staff and visitor entrance and as such it must be durable for operations with high traffic. The main controls for BMS/Fire Panels/ Security are to be housed in this area and repeated in an adjacent security control room.

Relationship + Connections:

Adjacent to Security Control room.

Space Requirements:

Amount: 1.

Dimensions: to be determined

Total size: approx. TBC gross floor area

Remarks (Specific Requirements):

ICT and Power supply must be maintained at all times with a UPS back up.

6.3.6 Facilities Management Storage

Core Function:

The Facilities Management store will be the centralised storage area for the Jersey Arts Centre. An extensive list will be produced through dialogue to produce a definitive list of items to be stored Storage will need to accommodate cloakrooms, furniture storage and chairs, publication material and internal stationery.

An area will be nominated for skips and recycling bins.

Space Requirements:

Amount: 1.

Dimensions: To be determined.

Total size: approx. TBC m2 gross floor area.

6.4.1 Commercial Retail

Core Function:

Note: This function requires detailed resolution and forms part of an on-going investigation.

Relationship + Connections:

Investigation on-going.

Space Requirements:

Amount: To be determined.

Dimensions: To be determined.

Total size: approx. TBC m2 gross floor area.

6.4.2 Jersey Arts Centre sales

Core Function:

This area provides the opportunity for independently operated retail. It also provides a possible income stream from Jersey Arts Centre sales.

Resolution is required for the retail concept through on-going investigation by the client body.

Relationship + Connections:

Catering areas will need to be adjacent and accessible to the Picnic Area.

Space Requirements:

Amount: 1.

Dimensions: To be determined.

Size: approx. TBC m2 gross floor area.

Remarks (Specific Requirements):

Metered service connections will be provided to suit the retail offer requirements. Connection to Fire Alarm, drainage will also be provided as required.

6.5 Studio Spaces

Core Function:

Jersey Arts Centre provisions of new studio spaces where a wide variety of artists, designers and makers can work in residence increasing the potential for greater participation and collaboration and attracting new audiences. The new studio spaces will be designed to ensure maximum flexibility in terms of differing working needs of the artists and designers, whilst also allowing for personal adaptation in every aspect of its operation. (All studios may have a live-in function, allowing the artists to immerse themselves in their work.) Studios will be open to the public on specific days.

Relationship + Connections:

The studios may be located as a separate element to the main Jersey Arts Centre – an auxiliary building which is connected. Or the studio will be encompassed within the Jersey Arts Centre and access is controlled. The studio will need natural day lighting. Ideally North light

Amount: TBC

Total size: approx. 25-30m2 each.

Remarks (Specific Requirements):

All studios will have access to water, (a sink, and a self-contained bathroom units). All units must be fitted with fire alarms and smoke detectors. Live-in option – (All studios to allow for a bed on maisonette floor, therefore the ceiling height must be at least 4.2 metres.)

6.6.1 Exhibition Preparation Space

Core Function:

This space will be used for preparing materials for exhibitions and will need to be immediately adjacent and have access to the main exhibition spaces and their associated storage space. The space should be a regular shape and flexible with power availability throughout and with access capable of taking large to extremely large objects.

Relationship + Connections:

(See main exhibition space).

Space Requirements:

Amount: 1.

Dimensions: To be determined.

Total size: approx. TBC m2 gross floor area.

Remarks (Specific Requirements):

As this space will be used for the preparation of exhibits, which require specific environmental conditions, it is proposed that the temperature and humidity are controlled in a similar manner to the Main Exhibition space. This will reduce the need for acclimatization when materials are moved between the two spaces. However, as certain materials may be without display cases in this area, the temperature band would be reduced to 20degC ±1degC. To comply with the National Heritage Act 1980 the relative humidity, temperature and light levels will be monitored.


6.6.2 Exhibition Storage Space

Core Function:

This space will be used for storing exhibition equipment such as frames, vitrines, lights etc and will need to be immediately adjacent and have access to the Main exhibition space and associated preparation space. The space should be a regular shape and flexible with power availability. The space will need to be able to store moveable display modules, frames and display cases. The frame store will need an efficient racking system.

Relationship + Connections:

Immediately adjacent to main exhibition space and exhibition preparation space.

Space Requirements:

Amount: 1.

Dimensions: To be determined.

Total size: approx. TBC m2 gross floor area.

Remarks (Specific Requirements):

Full climatic control where necessary, adjustable lighting conditions. High level of security required.

6.7.1 Workshops

Core Function:

The workshop area is used for construction, assembly and finishing of all in house produced items for the Jersey Arts Centre. The artists in residences will have supervised access to these facilities.

Relationship + Connections:

The workshop should be adjacent to staff facilities, goods lift, loading bay, exhibition galleries and studios.

Space Requirements:

Amount: 1.

Total size: approx. TBC m2 gross floor area.

Remarks (Specific Requirements):

Each working area to have environmental controls. Space must have a minimum height of 6m.

Sound baffles should be included in machine areas. Provision is also needed for adequate ventilation and extract systems from woodworking/metalworking machines.

6.7.2 Workshop Office

Core Function:

The workshop office is required for staff working in the workshop area.

Relationship + Connections:

The workshop office should be adjacent to staff facilities, goods lift, loading bay, workshop, exhibition galleries and artist studios.

Space Requirements:

Amount: 1.

Total size: approx. 10m2 gross floor area.

Remarks (Specific Requirements):

Each working area to have own environmental controls.

6.7.3 Workshop Tea Room

Core Function:

The tea-room is a staff facility equipped with a kitchen and basic food preparation facilities. The tea-room is principally used by staff working in the workshop.

Relationship + Connections:

The workshop tea-room should be adjacent to staff facilities, goods lift, loading bay, workshop and exhibition galleries.

Space Requirements:

Amount: 1.

Total size: approx. 5m2 gross floor area.

Remarks (Specific Requirements):

Each working area to have own environmental controls.

6.7.4 Design Office

Core Function:

Staff accommodation. Provision for workstation to be made.

Relationship + Connections:

The design office should be adjacent to staff facilities, goods lift, loading bay, workshop and exhibition galleries.

Space Requirements:

Amount: 1.

Total size: approx. 15m2 gross floor area.

Remarks (Specific Requirements):

Each working area to have own environmental controls.

6.7.5 Metal workshop

Core Function:

The metal workshop area is used for construction, assembly and finishing of all steel in house produced items for the Jersey Arts Centre. The artists in residences will have supervised access to these facilities.

Relationship + Connections:

The workshop should be adjacent to staff facilities, goods lift, loading bay, and studio spaces.

Space Requirements:

Amount: 1.

Total size: approx. TBC m2 gross floor area.

Remarks (Specific Requirements):

Each working area to have own environmental controls. Space must have a minimum height of 5.5m.

Sound baffles should be included in machine areas. Provision is also needed for adequate ventilation and extract systems from woodworking/metalworking machines.

6.7.6 Wood store

Core Function:

This space will store all wood and woodwork related items.

Relationship + Connections:

The wood store should be adjacent to staff facilities, goods lift, loading bay, workshop, particularly the wood workshop, exhibition galleries and studio spaces.

Space Requirements:

Amount: 1.

Total size: approx. TBC m2 gross floor area.

Remarks (Specific Requirements):

Each working area to have own environmental controls.

Sound baffles should be included in machine areas.

6.7.7 Wood workshop

Core Function:

The wood workshop area is used for construction, assembly and finishing of all wood in house produced items for the Jersey Arts Centre.

Relationship + Connections:

The workshop should be adjacent to staff facilities, goods lift, loading bay, wood store, exhibition galleries and studio spaces.

Space Requirements:

Amount: 1

Total size: approx. TBC m2 gross floor area

Remarks (Specific Requirements):

Each working area to have individual environmental controls. Space must have a minimum height of 5.5m. Sound baffles should be included in machine areas. Provision is also needed for adequate ventilation and extract systems from woodworking/metalworking machines.

6.7.8 Storage

Core Function:

The storage area is used as necessary support space for the construction, assembly and finishing of all in house produced items for the Jersey Arts Centre. These are produced mainly in steel and wood. This space should be insulated and lockable.

Relationship + Connections:

The storage area should be adjacent to staff facilities, goods lift, loading bay, exhibition galleries, workshop, and studio spaces.

Space Requirements:

Amount: 1.

Total size: approx. TBC m2 gross floor area.

Remarks (Specific Requirements):

Each working area to have own environmental controls.

6.7.9 Changing areas and Lockers

Core Function:

These facilities with service the staff employed throughout the workshop areas.

Relationship + Connections:

The change areas and lockers should be adjacent to staff facilities and workshop.

Space Requirements:

Amount: 1.

Total size: approx. 20m2 gross floor area.

Remarks (Specific Requirements):

Each area to have own environmental controls.

6.8.1 Staff Offices

Core Function:

This staff area relates specifically to those functions dealing with the art gallery house management. One space is required. This office will accommodate a maximum of twelve staff, workstations, desks, filing and miscellany in each will be required. Also, the Jersey Arts Centre also requires a multi-purpose office, which can be used for visitors, conference organisers and internal meetings.

All staff areas need to be ergonomic and adaptable with good light and ventilation. All need to provide security for staff and equipment.

Relationship + Connections:

Ideally all the offices would be in close proximity to each other as they provide interdependent services. They must be located to efficiently support the functions of the staff concerned. The sales manager office could be located next to the ticket office/sales function (for the featured exhibitions). There is less need for the other visitor office to have a specific location.

Space Requirements:

Amount: 1

Dimensions: To be determined.

Size: approx. 20m2 gross floor area.

Total area: 20m2 gross floor area.

6.8.2 Staff Offices and Workrooms

Core Function:

This is the general working area for Jersey Arts Centre staff. Office rooms and works rooms for various kinds of activities. The area needs to be flexible and adaptable meeting future changes in organization and developments in technology. The area should be quiet and comfortable for concentrated working patterns.

Specification of area layout:

  • Office desks (large)/ computer workstations.
  • Work area (large benches).
  • Rest area.

Relationship + Connections:

Adjacent to Reception Area, Open Research Area and Supervised Search Room.

Space Requirements:

Amount: 1

Dimensions: to be determined.

Total size: approx. 50m2 gross floor area.

Occupancy capacity requirements: up to 20 people.

6.9 Loading Bay

Core Function:

The Loading bay area will be required to serve the Jersey Arts Centre. The function is the safe delivery and dispatch of materials and parking of vehicles. The space should be designed to enable the safe and efficient loading and unloading, reducing the need for manual handling so minimising the risk. The area needs to be well lit, ventilated and secure. There will be dedicated Jersey Arts Centre staff to deal with deliveries, a small secure office area is required for these staff, which must have a clear line of site for the entire area including the entrance, which must have a security barrier. The Loading Bay should be able to operate on a standalone basis so it can be operated when the Jersey Arts Centre is closed.

Relationship + Connections:

The loading bay needs to have first line security, so a security presence must be accommodated, this could be incorporated within the security control function or staff offices. These should be adjacent to Goods Lift, Jersey Arts Centre Workshop, Jersey Arts Centre Storage/Depository Areas, Exhibition Galleries and Catering Storage

Storage Area.

Space Requirements:

Amount: 1 articulated lorries.

Dimensions: To be determined.

Size: approx. 150m2 gross floor area.

6.10 Sorting Space

Core Function:

Room for sorting the small to medium sized artwork prior to cataloguing or digitisation. The area should be quiet and comfortable for concentrated working patterns.

Specification of area layout:

  • Office desks (large)/ computer workstations.
  • Work area (large benches).
  • Storage.
  • Wide passageways.

Relationship + Connections:

  • Immediately adjacent to Cataloguing Area.
  • Easy access Loading Bay Area, Storage area, Interim and isolation storage.

Space Requirements:

Amount: 1.

Dimensions: to be determined.

Total size: approx. 25m2 gross floor area.

Occupancy capacity requirements: 2 persons.

6.11 Cataloguing Area

Core Function:

The Cataloguing Area is used for the cataloguing of (precious) art works. The area will need to be flexible and adaptable meeting the future developments in technology. The area should be quiet and comfortable for concentrated working patterns.

Specification of area layout:

  • Office desks (large)/ computer workstations.
  • Work area (large benches).
  • Storage.
  • Secure storage (sensitive archival).
  • Wide passageways.

Relationship + Connections:

Immediately adjacent to Sorting Area

Easy access to the Loading Bay Area, and Interim and Isolation storage

Space Requirements:

Amount: 1

Dimensions: to be determined.

Total size: approx. 25m2 gross floor area.

Occupancy capacity requirements: up to 3 persons.

6.12 Photographic Office and Cataloguing Room

Core Function:

The Photographic office area is used for the management cataloguing the incoming and outgoing artwork to insure the condition of the art has not changed since being at the Jersey Arts Centre. The office operates as a facilitator to curatorial projects, cataloguing, packing and unpacking the incoming and outgoing artwork.

The office will need to be flexible and adaptable meeting the growth and future developments in technology. The area should be quiet and comfortable for concentrated working patterns.

Specification of area layout:

  • Spacious room with: 6 Office desks (large)/ computer workstations / washing area / bookshelves [min. 4m x 2m] / fixed and portable light boxes / projection facilities.
  • Office with 6 computer workstations (separate room).
  • Room for ICT / printing room.
  • Cataloguing workroom (large benches, 9 x 5m).
  • Storage (shelving at least at least 10m x 2m x 1m).

Relationship + Connections:

Adjacent to Cataloguing area

Easy access Loading Bay Area, Interim and isolation storage and exhibition galleries.

Space Requirements:

Amount: 1.

Dimensions: to be determined.

Total size: approx. 40m2 gross floor area.

6.13.1 Interim Storage (Clean Room)

Core Function:

Storage room for clean incoming artwork prior to cataloguing, digitisation or storage treatment. Users of the storage are permanent staff members of the Jersey Arts Centre.

Specification of area layout:

  • Open area with shelving.
  • Wide passageways.

Relationship + Connections:

Easy access to Loading Bay Area (lift), Cataloguing Area, Digital Lab, Photography Office, Cataloguing Area and Storage Areas.

Space Requirements:

Amount: 1

Dimensions: to be determined

Total size: approx. 20m2 gross floor area

Remarks (Specific Requirements):

It is proposed that this area meets the recommendations for environmental conditions for BS 5454 for paper and parchment. All non-essential building services equipment should be located outside of the storage spaces and services routes should not pass through storage areas

6.13.2 Interim Storage (Isolation Room)

Core Function:

Storage room for contaminated incoming artwork.

Specification of area layout:

  • Open area with shelving.
  • Wide passageways.

Relationship + Connections:

Adjacent to Sorting Area

Easy access Loading Bay Area, Interim storage (clean room), Storage Area and Conservation Area

Space Requirements:

Amount: 1

Dimensions: to be determined

Total size: approx. 20m2 gross floor area

Remarks (Specific Requirements):

It is proposed that this area meets the recommendations for environmental conditions for BS 5454 for paper and parchment. This room should be located at the end of the air-flow to avoid spreading impurities to clean rooms.

All non-essential building services equipment should be located outside of the storage spaces and services routes should not pass through storage areas.

6.14 Art Depository

Core Function:

The establishment of the Jersey Arts Centre goes hand in hand with the development of a design model for the storage, care, deployment and access to resources. The major objective is to increase efficiency, to cater for user needs, future-proofing and great presentation and accessibility of resources.

This storage model will result in:

  • An efficient management of the stocks.
  • A good preservation of stocks, allowing staff to fulfil their new role, i.e. providing (active) service to the visitors.
  • Improved physical and virtual accessibility of the stocks.
  • Improved self-learning and guided support by presentation in themes and providing links between resources.

Relationship + Connections:

  • 8,000 items of art. Including 1,000 on Display therefore 7,000 in the storage depository.
  • Need for active stock management.
  • Efficient storage, which meets the need of the art whether it is size or sensitivity to light and temperature.
  • Effective and efficient use of staff resources and speed of delivery of art and/or materials to the exhibitions.
  • Located adjacent to Loading Bay, Cataloguing Rooms, and also with easy accessibility to the Exhibition Galleries.

Space Requirements:

Amount: 1

Dimensions: to be determined

Total size: approx. 100m2 gross floor area

7 Strategies

7 Strategies

7.1 Introduction

The technical design of the building will be a response to the challenges defined within this brief and resolved within the constraints stated within these strategies.

The biggest design issue will be anticipating the future needs of a technologically advanced building that will not be completed until 2015/6. The building will accommodate a wide range of diverse functions that will operate at different times around the clock.

7.2 Sustainability

7.2.1 General

The environmental performance of Jersey Arts Centre will be inherent in the design.

The design must establish the key sustainability targets for the project have highlighted that sustainability is a priority for both clients and for the island of Jersey as a whole. This is reflected in the requirement for Jersey Arts Centre to undergo a BREEAM Assessment to demonstrate its sustainability credentials through a nationally recognised indicator of environmental building performance.

After gaining a high level appreciation of the client’s sustainability aspirations, it is proposed to develop and integrate these into the design using the approach outlined below.

7.2.2 The Process

The next step in the process will be to establish detailed sustainability objectives specific to the development.

The outcome of these initial workshops will establish the sustainability aspirations for the developments, which will form a ‘sustainability framework’. The framework records the targets for the project, which will be updated as the project develops. This tool manages the process and communicates the sustainability targets across all aspects of the design and development.

The framework will set out the project’s aims in terms of performance but not how these aims will be achieved by specific technologies. The framework will be based around key topics, as well as the island’s sustainable development objectives, established by Jersey environment, and national guidelines. These are:

  • Energy and CO2 Emissions.
  • Sustainable Construction.
  • Water.
  • Pollution.
  • Materials.
  • Waste.
  • Land Use.
  • Ecology.
  • Social.
  • Health and Wellbeing.
  • Transport.
  • Innovation in Design.
  • Management and Operation.
  • Local Planning Policies/ Regulations.

7.2.3 The Components

The sustainability framework will comprise key headings and components, as follows:

7.2.4 Energy and CO2 Emissions

Jersey environment and national guidelines has stated that one of the key aims of the development is to minimise carbon emissions as far as possible within the constraints of the project. This will primarily be achieved by incorporating passive design concepts (Lean), efficient building services (Mean) and where appropriate, utilising renewable and low carbon technologies to further reduce emissions (Green). Feasibility studies will be undertaken to review possible renewable and low and zero carbon technologies that can be implemented on the site.

Examples of some of the technologies that will be considered are:

  • Ground Source Heat Pumps – Open loop and closed loop, dependant on ground conditions and suitable aquifer.
  • Linking into existing island-wide CHP/local heating network.
  • Solar thermal.
  • Photo Voltaic Panels.

7.2.5 Sustainable Construction

Opportunities for sustainable construction and operation will be identified and agreed with the client. This will include advice on design and detailing for the construction and registering the project under the ‘Considerate Constructors Scheme’. These go significantly beyond best practice site management principles.

Water

Opportunities for potable water use reduction, water recycling and reuse will be highlighted and assessed for the development. Particular attention will be given to the water usage in toilets given the large people flow expected in the new building.

Materials

Identify opportunities for the use of materials, which are recycled, rapidly renewable, durable, low maintenance, responsibly sourced and low in embodied energy. Applicable materials will be suggested and investigated.

Waste

A Waste Management Plan that covers waste minimisation, reuse and recycling at all stages of the development will be produced. The plan will reference procurement policy and the Government’s draft waste management strategy, which sets targets for recycling or composting of 25% of domestic waste by 2005, 30% by 2010 and 35% by 2015

7.2.6 Realization of Strategy

The concept design report will detail how the objectives and aims of the sustainability strategy can be achieved.

Following establishment of the sustainability framework, a series of sustainability concepts will be developed to guide and inform scheme design development to ensure the objectives of the charter are met.

The strategies included would generally involve the following key steps:

  • Analysis of the project specific conditions and constraints.
  • Assessment of likely impacts of project.
  • Assessment of potential options for achieving the objectives.
  • Assessment of costs, risk and benefits of each approach.
  • Recommendations of most appropriate approach(es).

7.2.7 Environment Assessment Method

The project’s sustainable credentials will be measured using the Building Research Establishment’s Environmental Assessment Method (BREEAM). Under this assessment process Jersey Arts Centre are aiming to achieve a BREEAM ‘Excellent’ rating.

During the Design Stage the following process will be undertaken:

  • Register assessment with British Research Establishment (BRE).
  • Agree assessment methodology.
  • Highlight opportunities for additional BREEAM Innovation credits (opportunity to add an additional 10% onto the final BREEAM score).
  • Advise on progress towards achieving the ‘Excellent’ BREEAM rating.
  • Collate information from the project team and prepare initial BREEAM assessment report setting out the route to achieving the ‘Excellent’ BREEAM rating for the new build element of the development.
  • During the design process, provide advice on how to maintain the ‘Excellent’ BREEAM rating when design changes are proposed that affect the rating.
  • Collate final information and prepare formal BREEAM ‘design stage’ interim report for submission to Clients and ultimately BRE.
  • Submit interim report to the BRE.

7.3 Structural & Civil

7.3.1 Structural Engineering

General

The criteria for the design and specification of the structure including structural loadings, analysis, tolerances, materials, fire resistance, quality control, testing and workmanship shall be as described in the current British Standards, Codes of Practice and Building Regulations, modified where necessary by specific project requirements.

The design life shall be 50 years as defined in BS 7543.

Superimposed loading requirements

Each part of the structure shall be designed for superimposed loading suitable for its intended use. No allowance shall be made for increased loading from change of use, unless specifically noted in the brief.

Wind and snow loading

The design wind and snow loads shall be derived from the Codes of Practice current at the time of design. In the absence of best practice guidance on the effect of climate change on future wind and snow loads, no specific increased allowance should be made beyond that in current Codes of Practice and Building Regulations.

Corrosion protection of structural elements

Concrete structures should be designed with appropriate mix design and cover to give a design life at least that of the building.

Steel structures should be designed to have corrosion protection systems appropriate to their location and ease of maintainability. In general, no structural steelwork should have a life to first maintenance of less than 15 years.

Structures in other materials shall be designed with durability suitable for their location and ease of maintenance.

Movement joints

Structural movement joints shall be kept to a minimum. Where necessary to provide an economic and serviceable structure, they should be designed and located so that inspection, maintenance and repair is possible during the life of the structure.

Operational

The Building Contract shall require that a structural maintenance manual is produced, which shall include the requirements for structural inspection and maintenance works over the life of the building.

7.3.2 Civil Engineering

Drainage

Drainage shall be designed to carry surface and foul water from the development to the nearby existing sewage system. Drainage systems shall be designed in accordance with current British Standards and Codes of Practice, and shall include sufficient access points to facilitate rodding and jetting from easily accessible locations. The proposed drainage systems shall meet the requirements of the planning authority, the relevant water authorities and the Environment Agency.

Roads and Hard standings

Roads and hard standings within the site shall be designed to accommodate the anticipated traffic and maintenance vehicle use. Access from the public highway shall comply with the requirements of the local authority.

7.4 Inclusive Design

General Inclusive Design parameters.

7.4.1 The Disability Discrimination Acts

The Disability Discrimination Act 1995 (DDA) brought in measures to prevent discrimination against disabled people. This Act was amended, most recently by the Disability Discrimination Act 2005, with further measures introduced to prevent discrimination against disabled people.

The Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) requires that employers, service providers, educational bodies, Public Authorities in carrying out their functions and transport providers do not discriminate against disabled people.

DDA 2005 introduces the Disability Equality Duty, the aim of which is to ensure public authorities are proactive in respect of disability equality issues. The intent is that public authorities build in equality between disabled and non-disabled people from the outset.

7.4.2 Planning Policy Statement 1: delivering sustainable development (PPS1)

The Government released ‘Planning Policy Statement 1: delivering sustainable development’ (PPS1) in 2005 to address the land-use planning aspects of sustainable development through the planning system, and to deliver on the Sustainable Communities initiative.

The statement clearly elevates the importance of high quality and inclusive design, placing it at the centre of the development process and requiring it to be the objective of all stakeholders.

7.4.3 Involvement of user-groups

There should be on-going and structured consultation with and the involvement of disabled people to inform the design of Jersey and the Jersey Arts Centre, as required by the Disability Equality Duty and Jersey’s own Disability Equality Scheme.

It is good practice and will be of great benefit for the project to involve user groups fully reflecting the diversity of the target audience, in the development of Jersey Arts Centre.

Consultation should focus on both specific facilities to enable an equitable service as well as the ’culture’ of the building and how people want it to make them feel.

Inclusive Design will support the on-going and structured consultation and involvement of disabled people throughout the project delivery and ensure that the issues arising are clearly met.

Issues to consider include:

  • Using existing networks and contacts in Jersey including local access panel and those consulted during the development of the island’s Disability Equality Scheme.
  • Ensuring that the diversity of the target audience is fully represented in all consultation including hard to reach groups such as asylum seekers and refugees, people in care and disabled people from Black Minority Ethnic communities and other groups of disabled people.
  • Ensuring that consultation is fully inclusive of everyone and takes account of their diverse needs. This is particularly important for disabled people and for people who do not have English as a first language and who are often excluded from consultation and opportunities to participate.

7.4.4 Security Design Drivers

From the “Functional Specification” the security operational stance is indicated. In addition, a number of locations/activities requiring enhanced security, or particular measures, are identified. There will need to be a security threat risk assessment (threat, vulnerability, likelihood and impact) undertaken for the project. However, in advance of this a number of issues can be assumed (list not exhaustive) that are likely to impact on and influence the security design (in addition to programme, budget and operability considerations):

Civil contingency – including emergency response.

Incident response, crisis management and business recovery/continuity.

Liaison with emergency services and local authority emergency planners.

Crime reduction strategy – surveillance, control of access and exclusion of ‘nuisance’.

Protection of children and vulnerable persons – probably including consideration of the Office for Standards in Education requirements.

Loss prevention and prevention of recurrence – including requirements of insurers.

Event management and security treatment for VIP and special occasions held within Jersey Arts Centre.

Management of the complex and concept of operations – including security operations.

Planning – including preparation of the ‘Design and Access’ statement.

Coordination with other disciplines – notably: Fire Engineering, Inclusive Design, People Movement in addition to Structures and MEP.

7.4.5 Security Design

In developing the security design particular attention should be given to:

SBD (security by design)– the Home Office Initiative, which aims to achieve security by introducing appropriate design features, that enable ‘natural surveillance and minimise features that provide opportunity for criminal activity (including terrorism). These features include: secure vehicle parking, adequate lighting of common areas, control of access to individual and common areas, defensible space, and a landscaping and lighting scheme, which when combined, enhances natural surveillance and safety and creates clear areas of ownership and responsibility. Embedding security in design in such a manner also enables security to become ‘transparent’, with mitigation being provided by the building design and layout: rather than the deployment of obvious security features.

This gives clear guidance as to the generic security issues and also gives general and specific guidance for the following:

  • Physical defences.
  • Intruder alarms.
  • Displays & exhibitions – including asset tagging and tracking.
  • Security staffing & CCTV.
  • Operating procedures.
  • Personal security.
  • Children & vulnerable persons.

7.5 Fire Engineering

7.5.1 Introduction

The fire strategy for the entire project must fulfil all statutory life safety requirements as well as the requirements of Jersey and national guidelines in relation to property protection, contents protection and business continuity.

The fire strategy should include appropriate measures to protect:

  • Life safety of occupants (Staff and visitors):
  • Life safety of fire service personnel during any rescue and fire fighting operations within the building.
  • Property.
  • Contents.
  • Business continuity.

7.5.2 Functional Intentions & Acceptance Criteria

The fire strategy must be developed in order to:

  • Minimise the likelihood of a fire occurring.
  • Ensure that if a fire does occur in any location that it is detected at the earliest opportunity.
  • Ensure that clear and concise directions and warning are given to occupants in the event of a fire.
  • Ensure upon fire detection and warning, all occupants within the building are provided with the ability to evacuate quickly to a place of safety removed from the fire.
  • Ensure upon fire detection, response time for the fire service is minimised.
  • Ensure upon detection the early activation of installed fire suppression systems.
  • Ensure that fire and smoke spread throughout the facility is controlled to acceptable levels.

This should:

  • Minimise the risk to occupants.
  • Minimise the risk of fire and smoke spreading throughout the building.
  • Minimise the damage caused by a fire, or the resultant fire fighting water applied by the fire service.
  • Minimise the cost.
  • Limit business interruption, or down time caused by any fire.

7.5.3 Reference Documents

The fire strategy for the entire project must meet the functional requirements of the Building Regulations 2000, or any subsequent revisions that may come into force prior to submission for statutory approvals.

In the preparation of the fire strategy the following documents should be referred to and the recommendations followed for the relevant and specific areas of the project:

  • Approved Document B Volume 2 – Buildings Other than Dwelling houses 2006 Edition or subsequent revisions.
  • BS 5454: 2000 Recommendations for the Storage & Exhibition of Archival Documents.
  • BS5588-4: 1998 Fire Precautions in Design Construction & Use of Buildings Code of Practice for Smoke Control using Pressure Differentials.
  • BS 5588-5: 2004 Fire Precautions in Design Construction & Use of Buildings Access & facilities for the Fire Service.
  • BS 5588-6: 1991 Fire Precautions in Design Construction & Use of Buildings Code of Practice for Places of Assembly.
  • BS 5588-7: 1997 Fire Precautions in Design Construction & Use of Buildings Code of Practice for the Incorporation of Atria in Buildings.
  • BS 5588-8: 1999 Fire Precautions in Design Construction & Use of Buildings Code of Practice for Means of Escape for Disabled People.
  • BS 5588-9: 1999 Fire Precautions in Design Construction & Use of Buildings Code of Practice for Ventilation & Air Conditioning Ductwork.
  • BS 9999: 2008 Code of Practice for Fire Safety in the Design, Construction & Use of Buildings.
  • BS 7346-4: 2003 Components of Smoke and Heat Control Systems. Functional Requirements & Calculation Methods for Smoke and Heat Exhaust Systems.
  • BS 7346-5: 2005 Components of Smoke and Heat Control Systems. Functional Requirements & Calculation Methods for Smoke and Heat Exhaust Systems.
  • The Fire Protection Association Design Guide for the Protection of Buildings.
  • Pace Crown Fire Standards – Fire Standards F1-F7.
  • Model National Standard Conditions for P laces of Entertainment and Associated Guidance.
  • Guide to Security and Environmental Conditions under the Government Indemnity Scheme, National Heritage Act 1980, Section 16.

7.5.4 Fire Safety Engineering

A fire safety engineering approach offers an acceptable alternative approach to the recommendations of the documents stated if this is deemed to be appropriate. In preparation of a fire safety engineering approach BS 7974: 2001, or suitable equivalent should be followed and used.

Where fire safety engineering is to be used the acceptance criteria must be agreed by all key stakeholders at the outset. The fire engineering approach must meet the agreed acceptance criteria to be deemed suitable for use in the project concerned.

7.5.6 Fire Strategy Documentation

The design Fire Strategy should take the form of a Jersey Arts Centre report with all necessary and relevant drawings, illustrations and calculations. The Jersey Arts Centre report and drawings should document the passive and active systems that together form the entire fire strategy.

Upon completion of the construction stage and prior to handover an “as built” fire strategy report should be compiled and handed over to the clients for record purposes.

7.5.7 Fire Safety Team & Consultation

The Fire Strategy design for the project should be compiled by a professionally qualified fire safety engineer consultant who is registered with the Institute of Fire Engineers in the UK, or an equivalent international organisation.

A multi disciplinary fire safety teamwork approach should be adopted for the development of the fire safety strategy. This is recommended to ensure that most effective fire protection measures are applied which are appropriate to this specific project. Early consultation with the main stakeholders is therefore essential.

Key stakeholders in this case include:

  • Client representatives.
  • Client fire safety advisor.
  • Authority having jurisdiction.
  • Building insurers.
  • An appropriately qualified fire safety-engineering consultant.

It is expected that the Fire Safety engineering consultant will chair the fire safety team.

7.5.8 Operational Fire Safety Management & Regulatory Reform Order

The Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005 imposes a general legal duty on the building owners to carry out a fire risk assessment of the premises upon completion of this project.

In order for the building owners to do this, the design for this project must provide an accurate as built record of the fire strategy and its related systems. This should also contain all of the necessary operations and maintenance requirements for the particular systems.

7.5.9 Additional Basic Requirements

The following requirements set out the basic additional requirements to the Building Regulations that must be implemented in the design of the project

7.5.10 Places of High Fire Risk

The following rooms should be enclosed in 30 minute fire resisting construction as a minimum:

  • Stores.
  • Cleaners Rooms.
  • Workshops.
  • Lift Motor Rooms.
  • Kitchens.
  • Staff Changing & Locker Rooms.
  • Plant Rooms.
  • Refuse Storage Areas.
  • Fire Control Room.

Where the recommendations of relevant statutory documentation suggest a higher period of fire resistance, then this should be adopted for the areas concerned.

7.5.11 Active Fire Protection Systems

Fire Detection

  • A full coverage, early warning, automatic, analogue addressable fire detection system must be installed throughout the building in accordance with BS 5839-1: 2001.
  • The type of fire detectors used should be chosen to be specific to the risks present. A combination of smoke and heat detectors should be used in appropriate locations throughout the building.
  • The fire detection system must be interlinked with an autodial facility for alerting the fire service in the event of fire.
  • The cause and effect schedule and evacuation procedure to be adopted requires to be agreed with the building owners and users.

Fire Warning Systems

  • A live and directive public address voice alarm system in accordance with BS 5389-8: 1998 should be installed throughout the new building.
  • Flashing warning beacons should be installed throughout the building for warning of occupants with hearing difficulty.
  • Informative fire warning and directional signage should be installed between the differing areas of the building.

Fire Suppression

  • The building should be protected with an appropriate form(s) of automatic fire suppression in accordance with BS EN 12845: 2004 and other relevant standards. The choice of fire suppression system used in each area of the building should be tailored to the use and contents of the spaces concerned.
  • The fire suppression measures within the Archive must comply with BS 5454 or be shown to be equivalent.

Fire Control Room

  • A fire control room should be provided to house the control and monitoring equipment for all of the active fire safety systems.
  • It is expected that the control room will be sited on an external wall with direct communication to outside.
  • Where appropriate it would be acceptable to integrate the fire control room with the security control room.
  • The fire control room should be enclosed in FR120 construction.

Evacuation Lifts

  • Evacuation lift(s) must be installed throughout the building as the primary means of vertical evacuation for disabled occupants.
  • Evacuation lift(s) must comply with the requirements of BS 5588-8: 1999.

Disabled Refuge Two Way Communication Systems

An electronic system of 2 way communication in emergency conditions must be provided in every escape stair throughout the building. The location of the system within the staircase should be confirmed by the designers.

Fire Fighting Requirements

Fire fighting access and facilities should be installed as per the requirements of Approved Document B and BS 9999: 2008.

Secondary Power Systems

All active fire safety systems must be provided with a suitable emergency back up power supply in case of failure of the primary supply.

First Aid Fire Fighting Measures

Portable fire extinguishers should be installed throughout the building in accordance with BS 5306-Part 8 to tackle small incipient fires. A range of extinguisher types should be installed to cover the various types of fire risks present within the premises e.g. water, CO2, dry powder, and fire blankets should be grouped at fire points in conspicuous locations sited alongside escape routes. All extinguishers should comply with BS EN3. Fire points should be located such that they may be reached in 30m travel from any point within the building. In conjunction with this fire equipment, signage should be installed to give general instruction / direction on the use of the various fire extinguishers.

In accordance with BS 7937: 2000 Class F portable extinguishers should be located within Kitchens.

7.6 Building Services

Services within the Jersey Arts Centre are generally comprised of the following and in accordance with the Core principles provide a flexible solution for the client wherever possible:

  • Heating (including warm air, underfloor heating, radiators, etc.).
  • Cooling (including cool air, chilled beams, underfloor cooling, etc.).
  • Ventilation (including natural ventilation , Air Handling Units, smoke ventilation, localised extract ventilation, etc.)
  • Power.
  • Data/Comunications (cabling and containment only).
  • Lighting (including General & Emergency, Decorative, Scene Setting, etc.).
  • Security (CCTV, Intruder Alarm, Access Control, etc.).
  • Public Health (including sanitary, plumbing and drainage installations).

With continued emphasis on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, and with new Energy Performance Certificates required for all non-domestic buildings from 1 October 2008, it will be important to ensure that all new systems and services being introduced to Jersey Arts Centre are designed, installed and maintained with this in mind.

The Heating, Cooling and Ventilation installations shall be zoned where practical in order to provide greater control in individual areas throughout the building. Natural Ventilation shall also be exploited where possible.

A new Building Energy Management System (BEMS) shall be used to help setup, adjust and maintain design parameters for all of the above systems, and shall assist the end user in monitoring overall energy use. The BEMS shall also perform fault indication and diagnostic functions for certain items of plant. This should help reduce maintenance and plant down-time and will ultimately save energy, time and money. All power distribution boards, control panels and large items of plant will be separately metered. These meters will be linked to the BEMS from which they can each be scrutinised to gain useful information on power usage. Sub-metering will be designed in accordance with guidance in Chartered Institute of Building Services (CIBSE) TM39. Consideration will be given to the integration of a new BEMS with the existing software protocols used by the island.

Lighting control will be optimised by the use of daylight linking the presence detection switching to reduce energy consumption.

In storage and exhibition areas with rigid environmental control requirements high thermal mass and reduced air infiltration shall be utilised to promote environmental stability and minimise energy consumption. The use of materials with high thermal and hygroscopic capacity will be considered in these areas where possible. However, it is unlikely that passive measures alone will be able to achieve the environment conditions recommended in BS 5454, so these areas will likely be heavily serviced.

The requirements for some art material to be stored at relatively low temperatures (some as low as -5ºC) under the recommendations or BS 5454, will require an alternative method of cooling to the local CHP scheme proposed.

The internal environment of the Gallery Space shall be designed to American Society for Heating, Refirgeration and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Class of Control AA. This will provide a suitable compromise between the integral conditions required for exhibits and visitors. It is proposed that exhibits that require different environmental conditions would be stored within conditioned display cases with inbuilt humidity, with temperature and light levels monitored.

The requirement for any resilience in the building services serving these areas is to be confirmed. The main considerations arising when adding resilience are capital cost, maintenance, plant space requirements and risk.